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tv   Tonight From Washington  CSPAN  October 23, 2009 6:30pm-11:00pm EDT

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continuing our conversation as we're hearing another account of what went on inside the sweat lodge led by self-help guru, james arthur ray, contributor to the book "the secret." this was a spiritual retreat, and it has turned deadly. we want to know what happened. we are finding out, we have with us ted schmidt, he is a lawyer of sydney spencer. she was inside that sweat lodge, getting his account. we have a doctor with us, telling us what happens to the body when things get hot. also with us, eric chase, criminal defense attorney. we hear this account, eric. most people hear all this and say, come on. james arthur ray set the table for this tragedy. how are you going to defend him? >> well, first we have to separate into two parts, the criminal part and civil part. in terms of the criminal part, and what happened in the sweat lodge, i don't think there is
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going to be any criminal liability. >> you don't think? >> i don't think. any type of criminal charge, you at least have to proceed in the face of a known risk of possible death. i think he was just stupid. and stupid does not translate into being criminally responsible. look, these people all had an option. they were all acting voluntarily. they could have left if they wanted to. they were just as stupid about what could happen in this horrible environment as he was. in terms of criminal responsibility, which is different than if you sued for money, but for criminal responsibility, i don't think there will be any. >> but civil, there are going to be good cases, is that what you're saying? >> absolutely. they put their trust in him, had a contract with him. in terms of civil liability i would be concerned for him and his estate. >> ted schmidt, can you comment on that on a criminal level? these deaths are being looked at as homicides. do you see criminal charges coming? >> i am not an expert in criminal law. i am a civil lawyer.
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but i will tell you, based on what we just heard, that what the -- i understand the sheriff is attempting to develop the fact that he had had sweat lodge experiences in the past, where people had passed out, and he had some -- actually did have some knowledge that there was a danger. whether they are able to prove he had knowledge that this is life threatening, i'm not sure. >> let's go back to eric. on that front, eric, we have all these people. from a lot of experts we've talked to in these sweat lodges, there's way too many people, 55 to 65, and only one nurse on hand of the is that something to where you could build a case of negligence against ray? >> i will tell you where there may be a possibility of criminal responsibility. that's what happened after people left the sweat lodge. from what i'vehead, there were some people who could have been helped by some of the other participants, and what he called his dream team, his assistants were not allowing the assistance to be given. it looked like they were
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protecting their own pocket books, their own program and weren't interested in protecting the people that were put at risk. that could give rise to criminal responsibility. >> we heard that account from beverly bunn yesterday. she works in the dental field. so she is trained medically and she wanted to help. but as you termed, the dream team would not let her. ted, before we let you go, does your client, sydney, have an account of what happened outside, as we know now people were dying around her outside of that sweat lodge? >> she didn't regain consciousness until she was in the hospital. but she has spoken to the woman that drug her out of there, and that woman said that she was foaming at the mouth, convulsing and her eyes were rolled back in her head. >> before we go, doctor, how quick does this get dangerous/deadly when it gets that hot in there, and there's no circulation of air? >> sure. well, it's a difficult question. i guess the people by the window did better. but once your body tempt gets
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above 103, 104, you're at risk for seizures, which sounds like she was already experiencing when they found her in the hospital. >> we'll continue to follow this story. ted, doctor, and eric chase, we appreciate it, guys. another disturbing story. football star, jasper howard, murdered. uconn student, he was murdered outside of a dance. somebody saw something. but potential witnesses are being bullied online, threatened about snitching. are they not telling what could bring this young man justice? we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln.
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welcome back.
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football star at the university of connecticut murdered in a crowd of 300 people. and now there are violent threats popping up online to stop witnesses from going to the cops. here's just one of the threats. quoting it. stop snitching for the love of god make the cops do their jobs. jazz didn't deserve to die, and the person who killed him didn't intend to kill him. anyone who snitched should face the social consequences. some of those consequences spelled out, stabbed, mugged, beaten. for talking to the cops. unbelievable. someone even posted a threat on the victim's memorial web page, a place to remember and pay tribute to jasper howard. his mom and dad want justice. and you're going to go to a website and threaten those who might bring justice. we welcome back hln law enforcement analyst mike brooks. also with us, kate monahan for uconn's daily newspaper. kate, 300 people were at the dance. we're not sure how many people
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saw, but you figure somebody saw something. are authorities at this point frustrated because no one's coming forward? >> well, i think from what i've gathered, talking to them, that it's been a little frustrating, because as we've learned, the police have said that there's evidence out there, video graphic, and photographic evidence that they know exists that hasn't been brought to them yet. so i think because they've been reaching out and saying, we know there's evidence out there, we just don't have it yet, i'm sure they must be getting frustrated, they're not getting all the information from that night. >> where are these threats -- where are they popping up? facebook? where else, kate? >> there have just been a few. but one of the threats, which was taken down, was on the facebook group. and another one was on uconn student's blog, a comment on a
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video he had done, a student reaction to the tragedy. both of those were pretty strongly worded threats that specifically mentioned violence. and seemed as though the people were not -- they were outsiders. which we do know that the people involved in this could be non-uconn students. the police believe it's non-uconn students and uconn students were involved in the fight. >> you mentioned facebook. here's just a, a disturbing post on facebook. this was posted on a page honoring jasper howard. it's pretty rough. we had to do a lot of editing here. you'll get the gist of it. it's basically blank the snitches. i know you would not be down with that. this needs to be a lesson for all of uconn. you will be stabbed, shot, mugged or beaten for blanking around. kate, have you talked to anybody, a potential witness ho is intimidated by this and keeping quiet at this point? >> you know, we haven't found
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anyone to specifically say -- to point to these as a cause for not coming forward. but i have reached out to people, shoot them an e-mail, or facebook message or something like that, to try to get ahold of them if it seemed like they were a witness. some people specifically said, no, i haven't talked to police. and wouldn't say why. i mean, i guess like i'm kind of going on limited information on what people's motives are. or they just think maybe i didn't see that much. or something like that. but i think we need to look at the possibility for maybe why people aren't coming forward. >> kate, let me ask you this and i'll get mike in on the conversation. have you been threatened? do you feel threatened by bringing this piece of the story to light? >> i haven't personally, but i feel like it is the kind of thing where, you know, it is a little intimidating, because if there are these people out there that feel this vehemently about this situation, obviously i do
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worry a little bit about my safety, or other people's safety. but i'm happy that the police have come out to say, if you have fears about coming forward, you know, you can relay that to them and they can help protect you in any way possible. and that includes being anonymous, when you call in for tips. >> kate, we applaud your bravery, by the way, to bring this forward. let's bring in mike brooks, hln law enforcement analyst. mike, how much of a problem is this. eyewitnesses going so lent because of this garbage, threats online. >> it's a problem. it's a problem in the public on homicide seats around the city. i used to do canvases all the time. no, i don't want to say anything, they were intimidated because people would come up and say, you didn't see anything, did you? no, i didn't see anything. but the ones who say don't snitch, they are really the ones who are the cords. please, keep sending them to facebook, keep sending them to
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different blogs, because law enforcement can find you. you can run, but you can't hide. >> can they be traced? >> absolutely, mike. i'm not going to say how, but they can be. could there be possible charges if these are people who did see something? and are intimidated? absolutely. tampering with a witness, obstruction of justice, threats across the internet. when they started -- when the internet started becoming more popular, and just as big as it is now, it used be threat to cross the phone. same kind of things. use of interstate commerce. if it gets bad enough and the fbi gets involved, because they'll find a way to get involved, if it goes from state to state, they could also face federal charges, possibly. >> let's get a call in. kathy is with us in massachusetts. kathy, go ahead. >> caller: hey, mike, how are you doing? >> good. >> caller: these low-life making threats to the people. they really ought to be shot. i'm sorry. their own power is by threatening people. and when people talk to the
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police and they do it anonymously, they should help the police because the police deserve the public's help to get justice for the family. >> exactly. you look at jasper howard, described as a great young man, father-to-be, a team captain. just received the game ball after a big win over louisville. mike, talk about that. police can protect people that feel they might be threatened. they can bring their anonymous information forward, right? >> you're a number, a crimestoppers program. you don't have to give a name. they just assign you a number and they contact you that way. no, you don't have to give your name. and there are, you know, tips you can call in to the tip number we're showing right now, mike. and you don't have to give your name. but that's the problem. it's really an epidemic out there, people don't want to get involved. this poor guy, he left miami to escape the violence, and what
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happens to him in connecticut? >> yeah. kate, are police continually on a daily basis reaching out to the students, to please tell us something? >> pretty regularly, uconn students get e-mail updates from the police on how the investigation is going. i guess what steps they're taking. i don't think that in the last day or so, they've received too much more. so i don't know how things are progressing. but i haven't heard too many new developments. >> kate, thank you for your bravery. mike, good talking to you as well. richard roundtree, biggest movie role in the '70s, this guy, he was the man back then. well, now he's facing breast cancer. it's coming up in "what matters." high y'all doing. my name is wyclef jean. at the first annual cnn heroes tribute show, i had recognized the great works of
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everyday citizens changing the world. as the founder of an organization which seeks to improve lives in my native country, i am thrilled to help cnn introduce one of this year's top ten honorees. now more than ever, the world needs heroes. >> life after katrina is hard for a kid. you have violence. the drug life. i'm just tired of it. my aim is to get kids off the streets. my name is derrick tabb, and i started a free music organization for kids in new orleans. let's go, horns up. we do more than teach music. we offer transportation. we offer instruments. i feed you, so you're not hungry. i give you tut uring. i call it the no excuse policy. you have no excuse why you're not here. press down on it. just like that. we meet five days a week, year round. we constantly learn something new. that keeps the kids coming back
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every day. i won't say i'm saving lives, i'll say i'm giving life. a whole different life of music.
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everybody knows shaft, richard roundtree, made the role famous. he's now a breast cancer survivor. richelle carey had a chance to sit down and talk with him. >> you got from it being devastating to being a survivor to now calling it a backhanded blessing. >> yes. >> what was that journey? how did you get there?
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>> it's quite interesting what happened. five years later, when i was diagnosed as a survivor, i didn't say anything about it until that time, until i was over that hump, that five-year hump. and i was at a golf tournament in north carolina, wilmington, north carolina. and the beauty of this event is every year you get to see where the proceeds from the previous year went. and this particular year they were raising money to buy a vehicle to go out -- outside of the city and test people. and i said, that's incredible. i mean, people who can get free examinations and whatnot. it's much needed. being a survivor myself, and the shock on everyone's face. i said, yes, i am a breast cancer survivor. well, that was an eye opener. i said, you know, i should start talking about this.
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and the feedback, so many men have come up to me and said, you know, as a result of reading your story, i went and got tested. and i got an early i got early i've survived. i'm a survivor as well. and those stories, i characterize it as a back-handed blessing. because if shaft can survive it, it's a good thing. and men are being tested and raising the awareness level that breast cancer is not gender specific. >> absolutely. not only survived it but clearly, i think there is a certain type of man that will listen to you but won't listen to anybody else. >> i say in my speaking, when the doctor told me i had breast
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cancer, i said that's something that women, i thought that was only something that a box could get and not something a man could get. not something that i could get. we are talking about shaft up here. >> yes, we are. well said. well said. well, shaft, mr. richard roundtree, thank you for sharing your story with us. i think people really perk up and listen and they need to hear this message. and keep on being a hypochondriac if that's what you you need to do. we appreciate it. for more of what matters, check out the november issue of essence magazine or you can always go to cnn.com/whatmatters. ddddd
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tonight a devastated mother has an angry message for her daughter's killer. watch out. we're coming to get you. somer thompson, abducted, murdered, dumped in the trash. she was only 7 years old and her mystery killer is still on the loose. now her mom vows to devote her life to finding the monster who did this. meantime, cops tracking down hundreds of leads. shifting through tons of garbage, looking for any clues that could lead to this killer. and tonight's big issue, how do we stop another child from being abducted and murdered? plus, a steamy sexual affair
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turns really ugly. an espn analyst accused of sleeping with a 22-year-old co-worker turned jilted lover. take a look at these photos from tmz. when the tv commentator broke it off, this heart broken girl allegedly started harassing his wife with nasty phone calls and letters. she even crashed her car into his house. we'll have all the jaw dropping details. and pharmaceutical suicide. bomb shell allegations in the anna nicole smith case. a pharmacist says she had a laundry list of prescriptions including muscle relaxants and methadone. five months later she was dead. who is responsible for prescribing her enough drugs to kill her? we'll take a look. will "issues" starts now. tonight, a frantic search for a child killer. the monster who murdered 7-year-old somer thompson is still out there. cops have interviewed more than 100 sex offenders in the area.
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they believe none of them were involved. police zeroing in on this sinister abandoned house right there. gosh, that looks like a house. horrors. the last place they believe little somer was seen alive. could this be the house where she was murdered? crime tapes surround this dilapidated home. burned up in a fire, officers are taking bags of evidence from inside and using something called light technology presumably to detect blood and fluids. they're also combing thank you dumpster in the yard. also under investigation, a public bathroom at the park right across the street from that house. is there evidence there? the vacant home and park steps away from somer's elementary school. plus a very strange twist, a mystery woman talking to local reporters. could she know something about so many early's murder? police are following up more than 800 tips as somer's devastated family tries to cope with the unthinkable. with the killer still on the loose, communities in northern
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florida are living in fear. many keeping their kids inside. somer's mom spoke out on nbc's "today" show. >> we're coming for you. >> you are you confident that -- >> we're going to get you. >> are you confident they'll be able to find your daughter's killer? >> i want to be confident. but i was confident that she was going to come home. and she didn't. but i know they're working. and doing it and i have faith in them. >> somer's body you was found covered by truck loads of trash dumped in a landfill. investigators went there on a hunch, expecting to find perhaps a backpack or maybe a piece of clothing. what they found, two lifeless little legs poking out from under the rubble. this crime is just unspeakable. we need to find a way to stop these predators from terrorizing us. that's a very big issue to
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tackle. we've got to stop somewhere. and the first step is to say, we here on issues won't cover this as just another crime story. we're going to cover this as a national crisis that must be addressed you now. straight out to my expert panel. pat brown, psychiatrist dr. dale archer, former detective steve cardian and criminal defense attorney mike eiglarsh. we begin with wjxt. adam, you're on the scene. what is the very latest? >> we are waiting for a news briefing at any minute now from investigators. we know this. there are two very active scenes right now and you showed both of them off the top. there is that landfill in georgia where investigators found somer's body. then there is that home righted near her school. she would have walked past to it get home and that's the last place several witnesses have told police that they saw her. one of the witnesses, we're
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told, is a 9-year-old boy who was riding on his bike, you saw somer leave, her brother and sister, the last time he saw her you was in front of that home. now the desperate search continues at that home. it started yesterday afternoon and it is continuing today. every inch, both inside and outside. home are being looked at by investigators. >> adam, let me ask you -- let me ask you about this mystery woman. we've heard a report that a mystery woman came forward and said, oh, i was suspicious about this home and a nearby dump, or dumpster on monday, and i feel guilty that i didn't take action. tell us about that. >> yeah. police haven't said much about it. we're waiting for a news conference to start any minute. there is that report out there. a lot of people in the neighborhood are you now talking about what they may have seen and could it have meant anything. there was a suspicious van in
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front of that home when somer was last seen. there is so much going on and a lot of people are looking back saying, wait a minute. did i see something? did i miss something? was there something there that i didn't report to police? in time? that's really what is going on in that neighborhood. >> look at this house. it looks so creepy and eerie. like one of those halloween house of horrors and this is the home that was burned in a fire a while back that authorities are poring over with light technology to detect blood and fluids. pat brown, what does that tell you? >> they obviously have zoned right in on that, jane. there has to be something there they're really looking at. other than, that there are so many people in the neighborhood, it could be. i've been real concerned about the fact they said they've talked to those 100 or so sex offenders and they're certain that none are a suspect. i want to know how. unless you have a video camera with them at a particular point or they're in a pulpit or out of the country, i'm sorry, you but
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you can't take them off the suspect list. unless they have something that they really know that we don't know. >> well, mike eiglarsh, i agree completely. you remember the horrible case of john couey who had a precious child in his trailer even as the police came by and searched for her. and it was after that search that he killed the child by burying her alive. >> i agree with you and pat. you never want to take anybody off the radar. look for corroborating evidence. unless you know for sure they're out of the country. and we know that over 160 people couldn't be. you keep them in your sights. the other lesson we have to learn from these cases, don't put out too much detail. specifically about the autopsy results. when one of these creeps finally starts to come along and admits to doing it, we want to make sure the information comes from firsthand knowledge of the brutality that he committed and not from what he heard from the media. >> you raise the issue of an
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autopsy. the autopsy has been completed. they are not releasing a cause of death. somer's mom issuing a warning on nbc's "today" show. >> just always, it takes just a couple seconds to tell them you love them. tell them you love them because you don't know what will happen. and just make them aware of stranger danger. i tried with somer. i feel like i've failed, obviously. >> nobody would say that. >> it just takes one. >> steve, as a criminal investigator, it has to be so tough for the investigators to get the autopsy results and then tell the mother, not just the initial news that the child has been found and identified, but then, what she died from. and whether or not there was any sexual abuse. i mean, these are things that are so horrifying to even talk
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about here. bull imagine having to convey that to the mother. is that one reason they keep the cause of death and some of these details from the public? because it is disrespectful in a sense to the child and the mom? >> well, that and they're preserving the integrity of the investigation. they're doing a good job about keeping this close to the vest. for them to reveal specific details including the cause of death and whether or not she was sexually assaulted may be revealing information that only the predator or the killer may be able to provide to police in terms of qualifying that crime. and can i add one thing about that? the children of that age, they're way too young. they're way too trusting and they yet have not developed the techniques or the tactics to deal with a predator at this age. >> of course not. and unfortunately, we live in a world today where your kid cannot walk home from school, even with an older sister, because she was with her 10-year-old sister and her twin brother, and they had an
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argument. there was a little girl apparently involved, and this little somer ran ahead and went out of the line. sight of her older sister. and may have got into that house. you it was right in that area where there is a house, a park, a bathroom in the park, and boom. she was gone. because isn't it true, adam, that this family jumped on this very, very quickly. i mean, the second that these kids realized their sister wasn't at home when they arrived home less than a mile walk, everybody went into action. and still, it wasn't fast enough. >> absolutely. that's what we've been talking about. the time frame here is so short. she left her brother and sister. they got home when she wasn't there. they immediately tipped off a family friend. they started looking for her. they called police. the time frame is so short. that's really amazing. when did she disappear? there wasn't a lot of time. how could someone have snatched her? >> i want to comment on that. this is what i call the wind
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over tunopportunity. you take that read that, to he is out there every day, 24 hours a day when he is not sleeping, looking for that wind over opportunity. all he needs is one child separated from her like gaza he will getting attacked by a lion. that's why you cannot say, just teach your children and they'll be safe. all they need is one minute away which is why we have to get them off the street. we can't protect them. >> more on this tragic story. coming up, yet another sex scandal exposed. we'll tell you how this is shaking opportunity sports world. but a mother shares her bewildered grief with the world just a day after her precious daughter's body is discovered. >> for everybody who stopped by and who has passed out fliers, who has brought me food to my work and my friends and my family, and if anybody can help
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me find her, i just want to say you thank you to everybody. and just bring her home to me.
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♪ you are my sunshine ♪ my only sunshine ♪ you make me happy when skies are gray ♪ ♪ you'll never know dear how much i love you you ♪ ♪ >> this is beyond heart breaking. the mother of 7-year-old somer thompson singing you are my sunshine. the little girl's favored song. now she is dead. her body found in a garbage pile. still out to my expert panel, dr. dale archer, we understand
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that law enforcement has interviewed all of the more than 100 registered sex offenders in the immediate vicinity. but they say that ochbl sex offenders are transient. they could be moving community to community. we heard about a van who may be long gone at this point. >> as of today, there are 686,515 registered sex offenders in america. the sad news is it is estimated 100,000 are off the grid. they're not accounted for. the problem is the system is overburdened. what we need to do is take out the minor tier one and tier twos, and focus on the pedophiles. those are the ones committing these crimes. if we don't have the resources to monitor everyone, we need to know they are either in jail or know where they are at any given moment. if they stop reporting, they need to have an arrest warrant issued immediately. >> it brings us to the big issue
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tonight, where do we start? take a look at these shirts. they are right. on we'll show you them right now. this has to stop. stop with somer. somer's mom pledged to devote her life to making sure this will not happen to one other family. >> i never thought in all of my life that i would ever have to do this to. even know anybody. i don't want to see another parent feel empty. i will not sleep until this person is found. i hope they get you and i hope they make you pay for a long, long time. >> we have to help this devastated mother. but you how? we always talk about reforming the system. that's like saying, let's stop global warming. it is such a big issue. such a daunting task. it feels like trying to empty
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the ocean one spoonful at a time. how do we take the first step in tackling this crisis in america? i want to hear, pat brown, to me, the first things set an intention, a goal. and express it. and i think the goal has to be a world where children can walk home safely without worrying about being abducted, raped and murdered. that is something we need to verbalize and say, that's our goal. >> well, that is a good goal. if we don't put our money where our mouth is on this, we're going off the path. we have a simple solution. when you have any kind of predator, one who crosses the line to abduct a stranger, to rape a stranger, to commit violence against a stranger, like we're seeing, they get 12 years and are out in four. look at the guy, you know -- >> phillip garrido? >> yeah. >> here he kid naps a woman, puts her in a storage locker,
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raimz her repeated lifrl he should be in prison for life or get the death penalty. there should be no other possibility. he didn't accidentally cross any line. he did something so egregious, he should get life and that's the end. it. the trouble is we have sympathy. somebody. not me. somebody has sympathy, the parole boards, give him another chance. that person he attacked did not get a second chance. they have to suffer their whole life or they're dead. >> i agree you with you 100%. we shouldn't have sympathy for the predators but we should have sympathy for those who are put away for nonviolent crimes. they make some mistake and end up in prison. we're packing our prisons with more people than any other country in the world. and the vast majority of them are not predators. and yet the very people we should have in prison, the predators, you see them on the dots around this town. they're all over the place. so we have an upside down criminal justice system that
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needs to be completedly revamped. steve cardian, you how do we separate the serious predators from the less serious ones who maybe have watched the porn that involves children which is or inch but not at the same level of being an attacker. >> jane, from the petty criminals to the very serious murderers, rapists and serial killers, we have a plea bargain system in place which allows more than 85% of the predators, the criminals out there, to plead to lesser charges. therefore, receiving a reduced sentence that allows them to go out and will act as a predator again before their original term would have even been terminated in jail. >> let me make a point about this, having served as a criminal defense attorney. the reality is that a lot of the cases they have against these predators are poor. if they went to a jury, they would lose. sometimes best thing you can do is get a conviction. they now become part of 100 or
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so people that can be interviewed in the future and now they're above the radar. >> we have to leave it right there. but we are working on a special report here on "issues" where we'll examine this in-depth next week. coming up, legendary --
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tonight the national crisis of drunk driving. the focus is on females, women like die an schuller who drove drunk and high down the parkway killing herself, four children and three men. eight total. mind-boggling. then the horrific case of the allegedly drunk mom getting behind the wheel with seven little girls, losing control and killing an innocent 11-year-old. and just today, she was indicted on charges of manslaughter, vehicular manslaughter, operating a motor vehicle while under the you influence of alcohol and assault. millions of women suffer from drug and alcohol abuse in this
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country. one fantastic group helps women recover from these addictions. called friendly house. joining me to talk about this epidemic, the president of the board of directors. wendy, is it my imagination or are we seeing more drunk driving moms? >> no. it's not your imagination. in fact, there are statistics that show in the last seven or eight years, the percentage of women driving drunk has increased to over 30% what it was before. i think a lot. it has to do with the fact that it is the bread winners, the stress on them, more pressure to achieve and to be on top. but you no, you are not, that is definitely what's going on here. there are places that women can go to recover. and it is a lot of women don't know this. that there are specific places that are just for them. friendly house, which you mentioned, is one of them. one of the oldest houses for women. residential treatment programs
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for women, recovering from alcoholism and drug addiction in the united states, having been first started in 1951. two houses, one chch on normandy. that was built in about 1918. and we have another house given to us by the grace of william shatner. >> i'm looking at these videos and these are beautiful places. some people are so afraid, women are so afraid of going into rehab. look, it is a great environment. consider the alternative. if you don't do this, you could kill someone nflt case. drunk driving mom, diane schuller, her husband insisted she was not a drinker despite the evidence that she was very drunk and high. >> i go to bed every night knowing, my heart is clear, she did not drink. she is not an alcoholic. listen to that. she is not an alcoholic and my heart rests every night when i go to bed.
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>> wendy, this guy may be in denial. are there cases where wives and ploerz battling addiction in secret so that their husbands don't even know? >> absolutely. the disease of alcoholism and drug addiction is a disease of denial. so the fact that it would carry over to women that are moms or soccer moms is absolutely the way it is these days. we have women who come into friendly house every day, whose husbands, boyfriends, loved ones had no idea what they were doing. they were encloses he had alcoholics or closet drug users. we see this all the time. and that i think it is an epidemic in the sense that the percentage of women drinking and using is increasing and they're not getting the help they need because there is so much shame attached to it or they don't want to tell their husbands until something like this happens where people are killed and injured. then maybe they should have done something about it. we're here to offer waem safe place to go. we don't turn anybody away for
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lack of pay. >> wenty, excellent advice. get sobe ferry you're a drunk.
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a steamy sexual affair turns really ugly. spann analyst accused of sleeping with a co-worker turned jilted lover. take a look at these photos from tmz. when he broke it off, this heart broken girl allegedly started harassing his wife with nasty phone calls and vicious letters. cops say she even crashed her car into his house. we'll have all the you jaw dropping details. and bomb shell allegations in the anna nicole smith case. a pharmacist testifies she had a laundry list of prescriptions including muscle relaxants.
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five months later she was dead. who is responsible for prescribing her enough drugs to kill her? we'll take a look. but first, another shameful sex sxanl posed. the philandering baseball analyst steve phillips has come clean about a tawdry sex tryst with the young production assistant. he hooked one 22-year-old will brook hundley for three days this past july after the brief affair was over, things got very ugly very fast. cops say young brook began sending harassing text messages to steve's wife. even more bizarre, she contacted their kids on facebook posing as a high school classmate. brooks seen here on tmz hand-delivered, allegedly, a tauntedi taunteding letter.
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that close encounter sparked this frantic 911 call. >> wow! police say brooke used espn company property in her pursuit of the phillips family. according to the new york post, she is still working there. what? we at "issues" wanted to know why and called the network but they declined to comment. hmm. very interesting. for his part, steve phillips who
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was sued for sexual harassment 11 years ago and settled out of court is on a "extend leave of absence." he says he wants to spend more time with his family. that should be a trifle awkward considering his wife has filed for divorce. oh, and gee, where do we even begin? how about with my fantastic expert panel and on board tonight, kim serafin with in touch weekly. i'm almost afraid to ask, what is the very latest in this one? >> well, you just said it. of course, he has you now taken a leave have absence. he wants to spend time with his family. and his wife has apparently filed for divorce. he obviously acknowledges right away, took the leave of absence, and it seems like this production assistant, brooke hundley is getting the bad rap. he doesn't really seem to be facing a lot of these bad, negative things about him, oddly enough. it seems to be all about her. and of course, you look at the past instances, we just went through an i shall you you've,
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not totally similar, but david letterman having a sexual relationship with someone who worked for him. and we really didn't hear as much about stephanie but we're learning a lot about brooke hundley now. >> there were more shocking claims in that letter delivered to steep phillips' wife by allegedly the young production assistant brooke hundley. here are some scary quotes. "he assured me -- by the way, brooke hundley was not arrested because the phillips family decided not to press charges. is it really up to them? this is pretty serious stuff. this is alleged stalking, had a rasment. it is even vandalism because she hit a post on the way out of the family home, apparently. >> right. i was sheikh my head because i thought you were coming to me with a crotch question. i told you, no more.
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>> you if you prefer, i could ask something about that. >> no, ma'am. you're absolutely -- i'll take a pass. you're right. i don't know why law enforcement don't, doesn't go after her for all the alleged crimes you just mentioned. i don't know. they should. >> i guess, wendy, there is a family that doesn't want to prosecute because they don't want the publicity. the cops are like, well, then i wouldn't get anybody to testify. so maybe it isn't worth the trouble. >> it is not up to them. you look at domestic violence court. it is packed full of dheefts are arrested when the victims were saying, no, no, don't take him away. you take him away and then let prosecutors decide how they're going to protect the people. state. >> i believe this one is not over. i think we're scratching the tip of this iceberg. so to speak. on the surface, this sex scandal, as kim just mentioned, it sounds a lot like the david letterman affair but there are some big differences. while brooke hundley is alleged
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to have stalked the brooks family, this young woman here, stephanie, was outed because she reportedly left her diary, her secret diary out. where her reportedly jealous boyfriend you was able to find and it read it and may have allegedly become enraged over what he read about stephanie and dave in the diary. so we can contrast those two, the way these two paramours are in the media. this is about stephanie. a pretty former late show staffer. you now check out the quotes about the espn chick. "after espn talking head steve phillips dumped his portedly, production assistant lover" and the post also called her schlubby. dr. dale archer, is there some kind of underlying sexism here in the sense, if you're ugly or perceived to be not attractive, and you do something like this,
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you get taken to task but you if you're cute, and you do something like this, as a female, it is perceived more as, oh, a fun anecdote and gossip? >> no. i think that in her case -- >> which her? >> right. >> the brooke hundley case. i think she basically you was on record saying she was going to do whatever it took further her career in the media. so i think that she is being portrayed in this case as a gold digger using him to try to make it to the top in the media world. and when that did not work, of course, hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. >> see, i think that's sexist. this guy has a track record. i'm going to steve on this. this is not the first or only time steve phillips has cooked up his own sex scandal you stew. 11 years ago, he was general
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manager of the new york mets and he admitted to having sex with a team employee lou sued him for sexual harassment. that case you was later settled out of court. the new york post quotes a source who says phillips is suspected of sleeping with several espn employees. so again, back to dale archer. this is more than hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. >> i had only done half of it. you now we have mr. phillips and say that, look, he does have a record of being a serial adulterer without a doubt. and that i think these two guys deserve each other. they ended up in a situation that is horrible for both their careers. he's lost his wife. he will lose his kids probably in the custody battle. so i think that it is a tragic tale and a cautionary tale for anybody out there who wants to enter into an extra-marital affair. this is what can happen on both sides. >> another issue is why does espn and all these networks hire
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beam significant baggage. they say we'll forget about. i you but every time i look at let's say, marv albert, i'm thinking, good analysis, cross-dresser, bizarre sexual behavior. i can't get it out of my mind. >> yeah, well, okay. all i can tell you is that it reminds me of that movie "fatal attraction." we ever more to tell you but. up next, is michael jackson's mom in the poor house? we'll tell you why she is asking a california judge for a lot more money. and then, is foul play to blame for anna nicole smith's death? her pharmacist drops some stunlers in court. that's so pathetic.
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it come in so many forms, the substance ahead, alcohol. in the pages of my you new book, i want, i talk about my addiction to alcohol and how i overcame it 14 and a half years ago. if you're struggling with any addiction of any sort, drugs, alcohol, food, sex, co-dependency, this book will help you. go to my website and preorder your copy, or you can get it in book stores. i hope you get help for yourself or someone you love. eeeeee
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let's meted today's winner. al from california says he hit rock bottom in 2006. he even got a black eye. take a look at that. black eye. falling off his bicycle on the way to buy drugs. ouch! that's bottom. believe it or not, it was his drug dealer. his drug dealer who told him he had a problem. but after struggling through treatment, al made it and you now he has more than three years of sobriety. look at the difference. look you how fantastic he looks. he gave up sxhoek sugar and he's been exercising regularly. al even rediscovered his passion for music and often performs on the third street promenade in
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santa monica. i think i've seen you, dude! after sharing your story, you'll be getting an autographed copy of my new book, "i want" plus to visit the set of "issues." either that or i'll fly out to santa monica and we can just jam out there on the promenade. i love to do that, too. way to go. congratulations on your sobriety. you new revelations into anna nicole smith's death. first, top of the block tonight. mind-boggling developments over the fight over michael jackson's he is tatd. michael jackson's mom having a hard time paying her bills. this is what tmz is reporting. allegedly her $30,000 a month allowance isn't enough. she apparently is demanding more money. keep in mind she was granted full custody of his three kids. waited a second. they have their own monthly income, a healthy 60,000 clams.
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i have to ask, where is all this money going? it has to be going to more than candy. according to tmz, katherine's lawyers said because she's played more money, she has to pay more in taxes. ladida. more pocket change because of taxes? they called this an embarrassing display of public greed. i'll tell you, i don't know. i think she could be taken a page from her wild spending son. remember him? the late great michael jackson? he knew how to spend. that's tonight's tom of the block. the tragic death of anna nicole smith. who is responsible for her death? the drug pushing enablers or concerned friends? she died from an overdose of prescription drugs. were they needed? was she overmedicated? that's all the stuff they're trying to determine in a los angeles courtroom right now as we speak. a preliminary hearing being held this week to find out if the
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one-time play mated you was illegally furnished drugs. now, just on the stand, a pharmacist by the name. ira freedman. he said he warned ana's doctors that she was being given too many drugs and was at risk for pharmaceutical suicide. take a look at this video. her long-time companion, howard k. stern. >> does that help howard k. stern? that he illegally gave anna nicole smith drugs? they died of an accidental overdose in touted 7. back out to my fabulous panel and again, we have to go back to
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kim, senior editor of in touch weekly. sort it out for us. a whole lot going on at this hearing. i understand some fireworks between larry birkhead and the prosecutors? >> exactly. a lot going. on as you mentioned, anna would be committing pharmaceutical suicide. he was so concerned that he actually consulted an expert, someone he worked with who said that the doctor apparently was out of her league when he saw this list of what was being prescribed to her. and as you mentioned, there are some fireworks, too. larry birkhead said that he felt he was being encouraged to ramp up the testimony to try to curry sympathy about daniellynn who said something to him. this demt d.a. said to him, she felt that he was taking howard k. stern's side in this.
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and you now apparently this deputy d.a. is no longer serving as the deputy d.a. and is back to being a you law clerk. >> this is a huge can of worms. thanks for explaining it. let's try to sorted it out. larry birkhead is the father of anna nicole smith's daughter. when she first died, birkhead was very outspoken at a hearing in florida about anna nicole smith's behavior. vis-a-vis drugs. you now it seems like he is maybe changing his tuna little bit. listen to this. >> at times i took her medicine and i was told by mr. stern to give it back to her because she needed it to live. and in addition to that, i just told her over and over, i said don't. something is going to happen toufl something is going to happen. >> when you said something, she referenced back to the bottles with the doctor's name oiflt you
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found some comfort that a doctor is prescribing this and that they were supposed to be in their right mind to be in charge of this. >> so kim, explain this to me. some people feel like larry birkhead is now somehow with ho k. stern and is backing off the whole drug abuse allegation. >> well, again, he is saying he is not taking howard k. stern's side. he was kind of insulted when the deputy d.a. imply thad he was. they were riding up in an elevator and she said she felt he was taking howard's side. he said he's not. he's telling it like it is. >> that she had a drug problem or she didn't have a drug problem? >> well, again, we are hearing so many different temperatures. it's hard to say she didn't have a drug problem when you are
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talking about injected drugs into her. >> jane. jane. >> i'm going to get back to you after the break. you can absorb all this information. hang in there, everyone. we're going to go to break. when we come back, we'll analyze the complex case and the drugs.
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>> she's using false news and getting prescriptions for thousands of pills without medical necessities and making them available to anna nicole smith who obviously was addicted. >> california's attorney general jerry brown talking about drugs and the death of anna nicole smith. was she given too many drugs? mack to mark. i think the dispute here is prosecutors say these people furnished drugs to a known addict. the defendants were saying she was a depressed woman, lost a
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son, she needed medicated for that reason. they are trying to say, it wasn't that they were pushing drugs at a known addict. >> there are merits. she could have been prescribed the medications at some level. where the case turns in favor of the prosecution, if you believe the pharmacist is the quanty, the gross amount of pills would be like handed a loaded gun to someone who wanted to kill themselves. the amount is problematic. >> now, dale archer, argument to pharmacist, he claimed the psychiatrist seemed unfamiliar with the meds she was ordering, prescribing eight times the recommended dosage for a hypnotic sedative and said she's way out of her league. >> yeah.
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she was prescribed multiple painkillers, multiple nerve pills, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, antidepressants. and a painkiller. there's no question she was a drug addict. any treating physician would have to realize that. if you give a drug addict those doses of drugs, you are committing grave malpractice and i think it's criminal. >> one thing that won't be mention mentioned in the preliminary hearing, was sex a motivator to pushing drugs. the prosecutor wanted to say she had a sexual relationship with the psychiatrist, the female psychiatrist. there's a picture of them kissing and snuggling at a club. we contacted the defendants
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lawyer and she laughed and said that's ridiculous. she's openly gay and they were at a gay rights event when they were hugging each other. >> exactly. as you mentioned, the judge did not want to hear any of this when the prosecution brought up something about the doctor and anna nicole. the judge said what's the relevance? i don't want to turn it into a circus about this. we didn't hear any of that during the preliminary hearing. i imagine if it goes to trial, we'll hear more about that. again, the judge is asking, what's the evidence. you have the video and there's a photo with anna nicole and the doctor. the body guards said -- >> whoa, whoa, whoa. they are pretty graphic. photos of them allegedly in the tub together naked? >> it's relevant. it's very relevant. if it's true, you let it in.
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if a doctor is having an affair with a patient. >> gotta leave it there. you're watching "issues." ddd
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we were able to obtain some physical evidence through some analysis of some of the evidence. some written evidence. we were able to develop a personal interest through -- once we reached that person and interviewed them. ultimately, they led us to or we recovered elizabeth's body. we're not going to have a lot to add to it at this time. a profound number of resources built from volunteer that is have been here, the vfw,
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american red cross. in addition, those firefighters as well as the highway patrol, fbi and the police department and sheriff. we're not able to spend a great deal on it other than to tell you the person that led us to this is also a juvenile. >> as you have just heard from missouri investigators, a heart breaking end in the search for 9-year-old elizabeth olton. just like 7-year-old somer thompson. elizabeth vanishes, walking alone a short distance from her own home and she never makes it. moments ago, police find the 9-year-old's body. i'm in for nancy grace tonight. thank you for joining us. we're going to bring you the latest developments in the search for somer thompson's killer. let's go to krcg for more on
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this breaking news. what have you learned. >> reporter: hi, jean. it's heart break in missouri tonight. i just got off the phone with the sheriff you were listening to moments ago. he told me interesting facts about how they came to find the body of 9-year-old elizabeth olton. they said they received a handwritten note. he wouldn't elaborate. they said that note led them to find a juvenile, who is a person of interest. it was that juvenile that led them to the body in the woods. >> where exactly was the body found? out in the woods, where? >> reporter: he said it's near the home. but, we are talking act a square mile radius they were searching. she had a cell phone on her. at&t was trying to get the
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locati location. they were in the area twice and didn't come to the body until the juvenile led them to the body. >> this is breaking news coming into the news room now. a precious elementary school child. 9-year-old. she was visiting a friend. she was walking home very close to where her friend was. it was about 6:15 in the evening, wednesday night. she never made it home. her body has just been discover discovered. nancy grace producer, you have been on the story from the beginning. what more can you tell us? >> he's older than elizabeth and an acquaintance. elizabeth knew the person. we do not know if it's a boy or girl. we do not know if they will be charged. >> we also know, this person of interest, he's in custody. he or she is in custody, correct? >> yes, this person is.
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they led them to the body of elizabeth. >> was an amber alert ever called out in this case? >> no. an amber alert was never issued. >> let us go out to pat brown, criminal profiler and author of, "killing for sport." we heard about the case when it happened, this little girl in missouri, 9 years old. wenlt missing. authorities said we're not going to call out an amber alert. we have no evidence of foul play. kids go in the woods, they play. this was 6:15 at night. she was 9 years old, not 19. what do you make of this, pat? >> it always sounds bad. if you are not a police officer, you think how could they do that? the fact is, they get so many calls and the children show up an hour or two later. i was at a friend's house. i went to the store.
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they get it so often, they cannot call it an amber alert all the time. when they are attacked or abducted. they are dead within 30 minutes to an hour. by the time the alert goes out, almost always, the child is dead. it's unfortunate. therefore, you have to decide what you're going to do about the amber alerts. i would like to say we'll put it on neighbor alert, but tif the child shows up, you pay for it. >> march to your legislature. that is a good idea. to david posey. pathologist. they just found this little girl's body in the woods. can you describe for us, forensically, what will happen as her body proceeds to the medical examiners office? >> yes. the scene will be core donned off. the police and medical
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investigators will glean as much data and evidence as they can. the body will then be sealed in a bag with the body so they will be able to identify this body with the bag. it will be taken to the coroners office where it will be refrigerated until the time of the autopsy. it's standard. >> once again, breaking news. a little body was just found of this precious, beautiful girl posing in the photo. out to the lawyer, susan moss, out of new york, ray giudice, tamara holder. susan moss, there's a person of interest in custody tonight. he's a juvenile, they say an acquaintance of the little girl. what does it tell you? >> it wasn't a game of hide oond go seek gone wrong.
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it was ridiculously more serious than that. the fact this juvenile didn't call in and say there was an accident leads me to think it was worse than that. we're going to be looking at very, very serious charges and depending on how old the juvenile is, we'll see if he or she is charged as an adult. >> exactly. that's my next question to ray giudice. they are saying this person of interest in custody is a bit older than 9-year-old elizabeth. >> it's a close call, jean. it's very much a sliding scale in juvenile law. the closer that young person is to 9 and farther away from 16 as juvenile court restrictions are, it's treated as juvenile court. the closer they are to 16 or 17, they may be charged as an adult. >> they are calling this person
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a person of interest. they are not labeling him or her as a suspect. it merely could be someone that is an accessory after the fact that has knowledge that may not be the real perpetrator in all of this. >> i don't think so. i think they knew he was a perpetrator right away. i don't believe there's a term person of interest. they knew it was a kid right away. they went in for him. talked to him. he led them to the body and they have the guy. fortunately, it was two days later. the evidence and confession are preserved. >> back to krcg, this is a little girl. she's 9 years old. what do you know about her? tell us about her. what grade was she in. what was she like? >> reporter: she's a fourth
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grader. there's an elementary school close by. this is heart ache. this is the news no one wanted. we talked with relatives. they say she was shy, at the same time, outgoing, especially around the family and with her nieces and nephews. she was a joy. it's been tragic. when they look at the four houses she had to walk by to get to her home, home from her friend's home, twilight, wednesday evening, people can't believe it happened. >> is it true volunteers wanted to take their time to search for this little girl and they were turned away? >> reporter: yes. there's been outrage about that. yesterday, thursday, this is still 12 hours after she went missing. hundreds were showing up at the command post to volunteer. they got around 200 there actively searching and the
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sheriff decided they didn't need more because they had to find it to a smaller area. they weren't broadening out the search at that time. people were sent away. people were upset about that. everyone was wearing gps locators on them. they were seen on the map what areas they were covering. was the body hidden somehow? this juvenile was able to lead authorities right to the body. >> the cell phone pings, matt they that found wednesday evening, were behind the home she lived in, in the wooden area? >> yes. they had trianglelated it. the pings stopped. they believe the battery went dead. they have recovered the cell phone since. >> where was the body found in
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relation to the cell phone pi s pings? >> cops aren't releasing that information. >> all right. near where they were focusing their effort today. they had been in the area of the pings before, it just appears for some reason, they didn't come upon the body? >> yeah. they searched twice in that area. at first, they were looking for the cell phone. now, they have found it unfortunately, along with elizabeth. >> to pat brown, should you turn away volunteers when they are offering to come forward? >> if you get too many, everything gets chaotic and you can't control what's going on. you overlook areas. i think they made the correct choice at the time. the other thing about the body, there's two things. one is the possibility, when you have a small body, it's amazing how hidden they can get. the body may have been brought back after the area was
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searched. >> we're going to go to the somer thompson case. two young girls both alive days ago, now dead. how do the communities reconcile th that? >> go and reach in and pull your heart out. that's what it's like. she's an angel.
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investigators in clay county, florida say none of the registered sex offenders living
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in her neighborhood are suspects. her body was found wednesday in a landfill in georgia. no one saw the 7-year-old get abducted. at least no witnesses have come forward. >> please, you don't have to tell them who you are. help us find who this is. i don't want to see another parent feel empty. >> authorities have been collect ing evidence from a vacant house in somer's neighborhood that's been undergoing investigation. >> they have spent hours picking through every piece of evidence they can find. crews are looking for evidence in the area where somer was last seen. >> the last person to see somer, appears to have been a little boy who lives nearby. he says he saw her near this vacant house. >> juan was one of the last people to see somer alive riding his bike. she was running, so i thought
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she was excited, but she had a frown on her face. >> the autopsy is complete. authorities will not say how she died. >> my son, when he found out, my oldest, he punched things, he bawled, he fell out. for a child, a son, a boy, men don't show emotion a lot. >> i forgive them for what they have done because the lord says i have to. as far as -- as far as what i'm feeling, it's pure anger. there's some really sick people in this world. >> we, all of us, our whole entire family, my friends, everyone, we're devastated. i can't believe that they would put my baby in the trash. >> i'm jean of the legal network in session. i'm in for nancy grace tonight. we take you to missouri where a
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killer is on the loose. a murder investigation is continuing into the murder of 7-year-old somer thompson, her body found in a landfill days ago. let's go out to tiffany griffeth of wokv radio. what's the latest on this investigation? >> reporter: well, you can see we are gathered at one of the major malls in the area. folks are gathering for a rally in support of somer. they want to make sure it doesn't happen to another kid here. here's the information we know as of 4:00. all sex offenders have been interviewed and stories cleared. there are many in this area who are wondering who this could be connected to. there's a suspect out of jacksonville. they have 900 leads that have come in. 200 of them still need to be checked out.
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we are waiting to see if anything substantial comes out of there. the home is being processed by law enforcement. no new details from there or the bag of trash that came from the bathroom of a nearby park. here's what came out of the news conference. investigators are looking at the trash that was found near somer's body in the georgia landfill. it's producing information that will help them narrow down where her body may have been dumped. >> investigators are very focused on an abandoned home that witnesses say was one of the last places that little somer thompson was seen. what is that investigation including? >> reporter: that's right. multiple witnesses placed somer here the last time she was seen. workers worked late into the night. they were looking there a
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construction dumpster on sight. it's not been emptied since the time somer went missing and still has not been. they thoroughly searched the dumpster and the home. there was a fire at the home at some point and time. it's been going through a refurbishme refurbishment. there's ultra violent light testing going on. you can see bright blue and green lights taking place in there. they worked late into the night. they finished up at 1:00 a.m. and were working at the location tonight. >> is there crime scene tape around the home now? >> there is. investigators are saying there's no physical evidence that led them to this investigation. what led them there are the witnesses that saw her there the last time she was seen.
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in the middle of hundreds of people holding hundreds of candles, somer thompson's mom huddled with others in front of the vigil set up for her daughter. >> i love her and i'll miss her. >> reporter: she thanked volunteers. >> i don't know how i could ever repay any of you for helping me look for my baby. >> reporter: as volunteers, neighbors and strangers stood in front of a teddy bear, many sang, "you are my sunshine."
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her mother said it was her favorite song. >> i want to go out to a very, very special guest. a member of her family. she's somer thompson's aunt joining us out of graham, north carolina. thank you for joining us. we want to know about somer. we want to know about the little girl we see smile iing in that picture. talk to us about what was she like? what did she like to do with her family? what was her favorite subject in school? >> she was a loving child and energetic. her favorite thing to do was run around the yard and play with her dogs and play with her brothers and sisters. she was so loving. she used to say all the time, i want a hug. she was the most loving child. she was so precious. we're just heart broken.
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>> i don't think any of us can imagine. >> i can't imagine what evil monster did this to such a precious, sweet child. >> i don't think any of us can imagine what you are going through, what you are living. what's so real for you. i want to ask about somer thompson's father. he's in north carolina and recently had major surgery, yet he's going to make it to florida, right? >> he was in a car accident that damaged his right knees, crushed the bone. it was reconstructed where they put pins and rods. he's not to put any weight on that for three months. he's in a wheelchair. i been trying to help take care of him, but it's hard for him to get around, as you can imagine, if you can't walk. >> how is he going to make it to florida? >> we have been donated a
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handicap van, so he can get from the wheelchair to the chair in the van. then back into the wheelchair, again. >> i just want her found. i want someone to have to pay for what has been done to my family. >> is there anything you need? >> my baby back. that's all i can say. 
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think that when she ran off, she was upset and she got to a point and decided to stop and wait and that this predator was waiting. he had been waiting. that was a perfect opportunity. there was no one else around. that's the only thing i can think. probably told her, i'm going to take you to your mommy. >> the tears are dried up. i'm still angry. i can't express in words. >> you don't take from somebody. you didn't take her from just
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me, you took her from my family and all these people. you don't do this to a little baby. >> they discarded my child like a piece of trash. >> put my baby in the trash like she's nothing. it's not okay. >> there's no measure of punishment that she deserves except the same death my daughter went through. >> i will not sleep until this person is found. i hope they get you and i hope they make you pay. >> i hope they crucify him. >> don't be lackadaisical on this. i told them, if you talk to a stranger, don't talk to a stranger. walk away. don't necessarily have to yell if they are asking you something. if they are trying to coax you into getting into a car, yell. obviously, we see, even that didn't make a difference. please, you don't have to tell them who you are.
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you don't have to -- you're not going to be in trouble if you give the answers. just help us find who this is. don't let another -- i never thought, in all my life that i would ever have to do this. even know anybody. i don't want to see another parent feel empty. i should have figured out another way for them to get home, a different job. i don't know. i'm their mom and i'm supposed to protect them and i didn't. >> one of the thing that is upset me the most, what i feel, i can't verbalize. i wish i didn't have to be here to do this. if it wasn't for my friends, family and these people, i don't think i would be able to get through this. >> i'm in for nancy grace
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tonight. a community in fear for the safety of their children. a killer is at large in this north florida community in the murder of 7-year-old somer thompson. i want to go out to nancy grace producer. there are multiple investigations going on in multiple states. explain that to us. >> that's right. in addition to the vacant house where somer was last seen, there's an investigation going on there now. the florida department of investigation is combing through that house. while that's going on, we have 55 miles to the north at a landfill in georgia, we have a similar investigation where they are going through pain stakingly 225 tons of trash to find evidence at that location where somer's body was found. >> i want to go out to a special guest, laura, the aunt of somer
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thompson. thank you for joining us under such a trying time, but a time that investigators are trying to find who murdered your beautiful, beautiful relative. when was the last time you spoke with somer? >> a few months ago. >> what did she say? >> what? >> what did she say to you? >> caller: she told me she loved me and we couldn't wait to see each other, again. she asked about her kitty that was here, rosy. she loves kitty cats and puppy dogs. >> were there plans for the holidays? >> caller: my husband took two weeks off work for christmas. we were going to go down and see them at christmas time. we just hadn't talked about it and discussed it. now, we'll never get to see her, again.
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>> you have such beautiful memories of such a lovely, precious, precious little girl whose life was cut so short. we are so sorry for your loss. >> caller: thank you. >> i want to go to lisa who is a neighbor and a friend of somer thompson and her whole family. lisa, you have helped so much in all of this with support and help with the community. talk to us about the community where somer thompson and her mother live. what is it like out there in north florida? >> oh, we have a wonderful neighborhood. north florida all together is wonderful. we have a wonderful close-knit community we live in. we all watch for each other's children. we help each other when they need help. if a parent is not -- picking up a child, it's nothing to pick up
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the phone and say hey, can you pick her up today. it's no problem. we all share that job. >> have you seen the vacant house that investigators are calling a crime scene? have you seen it? >> i have not seen the actual house, but know where it is. >> how close is it to where somer lived? how close? >> approximately, half a mile. >> half a mile. just about half way home. was this the regular route that somer and her twin brother and little sister, the regular route they walk every day after school? >> yes, ma'am. all the children in our neighborhood walk the same -- it's the only way to get there. you have to walk. you have to take that route. straight up one sidewalk -- >> yeah, go ahead. >> excuse me?
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>> go ahead, please. >> get to one cross guard, take a left. there's usually a police officer there making sure the children are safe against the next cross guard. they get past that one and there's another cross guard and you are at the school. >> unbelievable. to susan moss, the reason i asked the question if this was a regular route that little somer thompson walked, that could be very important evidence because this is going to be a first degree murder case. this, i believe, is going to be a death penalty case. we are in florida. there are special circumstances for death penalty cases. this fits it. it's a little girl under the age of 12. a killing during the commission of a felony. but, if it's the regular route she walked, this could be premeditated and preplanned. >> absolutely and that also means the death penalty. the reason they want to know if
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it's the regular route, they want to know if this person was watching her for several days. her body found in a dump will intensify the hunt. look at this mother. anyone who saw anything needs to come forward. we need to make sure our children are safe. by getting this scum bag off the street, it's the only way to do it. >> to dr. david posey, dna is critically important on this body. i know about the touch dna that now investigators can get when someone touches the clothing of a child like this. >> that's correct. actually, it's very important because the last person to touch the object or individual, that d dna will be there. they will glean the evidence and data. they will get the fingerprints and have that available. >> it could possibly link them
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to the killer. >> it's national breast cancer awareness month. tonight, a resource center founded nine years ago by barbara whose mother struggled d to find wigs and everything she needed during her battle. they provide product helping breast cancer patients including skin care, turbines, exercise and lounge wear, swim suits. if this battle touches your life, go to women'spersonalhealth.com. together, we can win the war on breast cancer.
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i just want them to know that everything they are doing is not in vain. i have had grown men over here cry on my shoulder and say they didn't do enough. i don't want them to feel like that. everybody did so much. it was what it was. >> i want you to know, i will not sleep until this person is
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found. i hope they get you and i hope they make you pay for a long, long time. i just love her and i'll miss her. i want him found. i want someone to pay for what's been done to my family. she had my same personality. i miss holding her and giving her a kiss and not knowing if i said i love her. i know she knew that but you never know. >> i'm very confident we are going to have a positive outcome and find the people or people -- person or people responsible for the death of this beautiful child. >> you don't take from somebody. you took her from me, my family and all these people.
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you don't do this to a little baby and put my baby in the trash like she's nothing. it's sick. i don't know what i'm allowed to say. but this sick man, person, he's not a man, he's not a person, was waiting. he'd been waiting. it was a perfect opportunity. there was no one else around. it's the only thing i can think and probably told her i'm going to take you to your mommy. >> there's a child killer on the loose. we're going to catch him and bring him to justice. >> watch out, we're coming. we're going to get you. >> i'm in for nancy grace tonight. after patricia saunders, clinical psychologist. her mom has shown tremendous grace hours after she found out her daughter was murdered. she has to be in shock. where does she get the strength
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from? >> i don't think she's in shock. most people shut down emotionally. they would be numb and feel nothing. they would become passive and withdrawal, which is a normal response. what miss johnson is able to do is find the best resilience. she's talking about her feelings, her own doubts, she's reaching out to other people and giving voice to what probably the whole country is feeling. having a social network, being a person of faith, having a strong family are those factors that help people live through this worst kind of trauma. >> she was, this morning, on the "today" show talking to the country to help find her daughters killer. take a listen. >> we're coming for you. >> are you confident they will be able to find your daughters killer? >> i want to be confident, but,
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i was confident that she was going to come home -- and she didn't. but i know they are working. and doing it. i have faith in them. just how beautiful she was. how sweet and innocent and just wanted to always -- just wanted to be friends with everybody. always, it takes a couple seconds to tell them you love them. tell them you love them. you don't know what's going to happen. just -- just make them aware of stranger danger. i tried with somer. i feel like i failed, obviously. >> nobody would say that. >> if it just helps one. >> that's somer thompson's mother this morning. i want to go to lisa, neighbor
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and friend near the families home. you have rallies people, you and your neighbors very quickly to form a group called moms against predators. tell us about that group. >> well, now, to the left, they are having a different kind of rally. there's a lot of people, i'm overwhelmed at who showed up. basically, we are getting something together where the children are going to know that purple is safe. if they see any of us on the streets in between, they see trouble, any kind of trouble, they are hurt, don't feel good, anything between the crossing guard, we will be someone safe for them to come to. >> purple is good. does that correlate with the purple ribbon she had in her hair yesterday? >> yes, ma'am. purple was somer's favorite color. that's the color we have chosen.
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everything is purple now. we're going to let the children know -- yes, it is. they're going to let them know that it's a safe color for them to come to. >> to pat brown, criminal profiler. when i see you on the air, pat, i stop everything i'm doing and listen. what you have to say about cases is something from experience and what you have gone through. at this point in the case, what are your thoughts? >> i'm concerned with clearing the sex offender suspects. there's one way to do it. there's a pastor on a pulpit and people watching you. another you have seen on a camera. or you are sitting in another country and couldn't get back on an airplane. other than that, there's no way to clear these guys. either they have an idea of someone else who did it or they
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are not telling the truth. it concerned me. everybody out there should be looking at these guys. if i see that guy, he's said or done something weird, you have to get that information to the police. don't discount it unless you can prove they weren't involved. >> to ray giudice, do you agree or disagree. you have 90 sex offenders and they have been eliminated. >> a lot of sex offenders are on gps, ankle bracelets and their position can be found and they can be cleared. we rounded up all the sex offenders in the previous case in missouri and it doesn't look like they had anything to do with it, either. i'm not discounting what pat said, but the round up of sex offenders, when a child is missing and the intense focus on them to the use of lack of resources on a different type of
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profile. i think it may be a mistake. >> all right. tonight, cnn heroes. >> how y'all doing? at the first name is wycliff jones at the first annual cnn heroes show, i had a hand in helping recognize the roles of everyday citizens helping the change the world i am thrilled to help cnn introduce one of this year's top ten honorees, now more than ever the world needs heroes. >> it's really hard for a kid because of violence, the drug li life. i was tired of it, my aim was to get kids off the street. my name is derick tabb and i started a free music program for
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the kids. we do more than just teach music, we often transportation, we offer instruments, i give you tut forring. we meet five days a week year round. we're constantly learning something new, and that's with the kids coming back every day. i won't say that i'm saving lives, but i'm giving life. a whole different life of music.
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a look back at the stories making the headlines this week. you didn't take her from just me, you took her from my family, you took her from all of these people and you don't do this to a little baby and put my baby in the trash like she's nothing. that's not okay. it's not okay. >> we can now say officially that the medical examiner there has positively identified the body that was located in the landfill yesterday as the missing child from orange park, somer thompson.
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>> someone has morgan. please let her come home safely. >> virginia police are asking for the public to help locate this missing virginia tech student. she is morgan harrison, she has not been heard from since she and her friends went to a metallica concert in virginia. >> her mother, jill harrington, ms. harrington, thank you for being with us. >> thank you so much for letting us come on and putting morgan's information out there. >> yeah, okay. >> how many legitimate 911 calls came in that day? how many people needed police, needed sheriffs, needed help? but no, everybody was consumed trying to save this 6-year-old boy's life, up in a balloon. he was never there. law enforcement urgently searching for 9-year-old elizabeth alton.
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elizabeth vanishes on a quarter of a mile walk from her house to her friend's home. >> i just want my sister home safely. i don't know who would have done anything, but we all want her home safely. >> i want you to know that i will not sleep until this person is found. i hope they get you and i hope they make you pay. for a long, long time. >> who would murder this beautiful brown-eyed little cherrub and throw her away like trash? before somer's murder lands in hell, we want this child killer now. >> tonight,let us stop to remember army sergeant james mcdonald. 26 years old, from screen know, wisconsin, he was killed in iraq. on a second tour of duty, he was awarded the purple heart.
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army commendation medal and the humanitarian service medal. he loved football and dreamed of being a firefighter. he leaves behind his grieving parents joan and douglas. james mcdonald, he's an american hero. thank you so much to all of our guests and to you for being at home, being with us tonight. thank you so much, see you tomorrow night, 8:00 sharp eastern. until then, good night, everybody.
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tonight on the weekend wind jup, the decider is going to put his money from his foot usually is, in his mouth. george w. bush takes a gig as a motivational speaker. and charles clemmons will be here to talk about his new book. and the fabulous lily tomlin joins me to discuss her new show opening in las vegas. all this and more.
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welcome to the weekend wind-up. i'm joined by comedian nick depaulo, comedian carol leifer, author of the book, "when you lie about your age." and selena espinosa. the first story was about this balloon boy, everybody covered it this week, it was all over the media, right? >> what happened. >> you know the story. don't make me go over it again, i have a headache from it. now they're saying that the wife didn't really know. that's the latest. that she was like the heda nusbaum, not aware. what do you think? >> i think the whole thing is an insult to people who work long and hard to get on tv like tori spelling and the kardashians. >> and paris hilton. >> these people have really been in the trenches and -- >> she's right. >> you think so too?
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>> i have been telling jokes to drunks for 20 years, all i have to do is tie my nephew's leg to a box and call the cops? >> he was kind of create tiive certain, weird sort of way. >> he was also very controlling, if you saw the "wife swap" episode, there was a lot of anger going on there. >> he as a history of violence. here's a sample of his short temper from abc's "wife swap". >> she starts a project and she finishes it and you suck! >> i only have one word to say, loser! >> what's with the air cut? >> why don't you not be so obnoxious, your kids are picking that up. >> your kids are [ bleep ] just like you. >> is he mad today? >> you would think there would be a couple that would make jon and kate look like ozzie and harriet? >> don't you think she should divorce him now?
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it's enough. if in fact she didn't know anything. she made the 911 call. >> but what about the kids, joy? who's going to buy the kites for the kids? >> how much therapy are these kids going to need? how much prozac? >> probably a deal for a reality show. they'll have a generation of nit wits for the next 20 years to watch because of this guy and his shallow wife that he met in acting class in l.a., by the bay. . >> the 911 call, she sounded like meryl streep on it. she was so sincere and she meant it. so maybe she did mean it, maybe she's not that good an actress, maybe she meant it. is that possible? >> the story of steve phillips. >> let's change the subject. . george w. bush, remember him. >> sure. >> one of the most inarticulate presidents we have ever had? >> yes. >> he's going to be a motivational speaker. he and laura are going on the
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road, like you, like a comedian. >> houston. >> they're going to houston. i mean he and laura are going on the road and they're going to do motivational speeches. they're going to do three of them and they're making $500,000. what do you think about that? isn't this like the menendez brothers being family counselors? it's ridiculous. >> let's say your company is doing too well, you want your sales to go down, you bring him in. >> i think being a motivational speaker is a lot like asking adam lambert who he likes in se patriots-steelers game. >> that went right over my head. the seminar includes rudy giuliani and colin powell. i thought colin powell didn't hang around with these thugs anymore.
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>> i think the greatest speech maker ever and he stinks. >> i have to take issue with that. first of all, bush did too many things that were bad, let's face it. i would rather have somebody who doesn't do anything, oh, let's invade a country, let's take your rights away. let's invade a country. >> what rights have been taken away? no rights have been taken away. >> he wanted war and he got a war. he got what he wanted. >> let's go have a war, that's a good motivation. >> that was just on the blow, he had a war for no reason? we're going to go back to that again. >> you know it's true. >> his first speech is going to be in texas, if it were the bordering states, i would be a little worried. >> why? >> that he would invade for no reason? like iraq. >> what about this other case that we have been talking about this week, this sex scandal between this espn analyst,
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baseball analysts, steve phillips, he's having an affair with a 22-year-old assistant. >> in a balloon. >> no. >> the guy has a wife and four kids. just to bring you up to it. you know, when are these husbands going to learn? >> let's ask you now? what is wrong with these guys, these powerful guys who destroy it all. why can't they put a post it on your zipper, keep it in your pants? >> he's going to -- >> he's going to take a leave of absence from espn, he could lose his job. >> i love how he discusses like it's a monolithic thing, 's just men who cheat on their wives. >> are you feeling picked on? >> i have slhave been faithful my wife. i have slipped up twice in 20 years. >> his wife was described in the
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post as love lovey. she kind of looks like the philly fanatic in shorts. i think that makes a difference, if the other woman is a little bit dlugey. it's like if she were a very attractive woman, it's like, hey, okay. >> some guys like girls who look like jack black. but maybe the wife wasn't meeting his emotional needs. because it obviously wasn't a physical thing. >> i think he had an affair in the old days. please, he's a dog this guy. but letterman's girlfriend was not like a beautiful girl and even his wife, she's a regular-looking person. >> yeah. >> no glamazon. >> but he's like a crazy stalker and i like how the glenn close in "fatal attraction" has become the suzanne b. anthony of
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hollywood stars. >> women have said to her, thank you, that has really controlled my husband. it's just the greater. . >> this guy hundley, the woman hundley. >> she got it right the first time. >> you got me so crazy that she's so not attractive, i think she's a man. she allegedly left creepy voicemails for phillips and his wife and even paid a visit to their house which led to this 911 call from his wife. >> wilton 911 what's your emergency. >> please come to [ bleep ] i have a crazy woman who's involved with my husband and she has come to my house to harm me and my children. >> okay, ma'am, is she outside? >> she's pulling to my door right now, she's in a blue prius. she just pulled past me. >> okay, so you're -- >> she's pulling down my driveway on [ bleep ].
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it's a blue car, it's a blue sedan. >> okay was that an overreaction or what? she did have a woman in her driveway and she looked a little dangerous. >> and we have all seen "fatal attraction." >> she's taking my kid to a roller-coaster ride. >> the bunny is in the pot, come quickly. >> so this is just natural for her to panic when this woman comes to her house? >> i've got danny devito in my driveway. >> espn baseball analogist -- why would phillips take the risk as a colleague was fired for a similar act? >> i think men -- these kinds of men don't think they're going to get caught. they think they're above it all. these kind, we know you have established you're not one of those kind of men. you said you've been faithful.
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his wife had already tolerated another affair. he had been accused of this before. she stayed. he's like this has happened once before and she's in it. >> this doesn't speak well for men and women who want to have it all, a family, a career, but this is having it all for men. >> oh, i see. >> having a young girl on the side, a wife at home. that's having it all. i'm not saying it's rite, but i'm just telling you. >> how about the old-fashioned way? hair plugs and a porsche. >> why can't they go through their midlife crisis just becoming shopaholics. >> you hate us men no matter what. >> we love you and we thank you for coming on the show. you're so funny, we love you. >> and if you're in texas, nick depaulo will be at the houston impr improv.
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and coming up next, nick's big man clarence clemmons, what a show.
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one morning in 1972, he kissed his wife and kids goodbye and headed out on the road with bruce springsteen and they have been together off and on for over 35 years. that's a marriage. just one chapter in the extraordinary career of clarence clemons. his new memoir is "big man, real life and tall tales." it sounds like your ex-girlfriend thought you and bruce were gay, is that a fact? >> that's a fact. from the first time we saw each other, we stayed together for two weeks. we were just inseparable. >> you were in love? >> i was, i still am in love. but it's not a sexual love. it's beyond sex. >> what do you love most? is it his eyes? what is it?
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>> his dedication to what he does, it's his belief in what he's doing, the energy he creates. >> he works very hard. >> he works very hard. >> and i'm sure you did all those years. >> yes, still do. >> in your book, you talk about your love life a lot. how many women have you over the years in the e street band? >> marriages or? >> just having them for one night. >> he has had quite a few marriages. >> not you, him. but you do talk about the women in the book? >> yeah, i do and i have had my share of good times and it was fun. but now i have really found the person i want to spend the rest of my life with. >> what's she like? >> she's young and -- >> how young, clarence? >> she's younger than me? >> how much younger.
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>> i think i'm older than her parents. >> you're older than her parents? that's always hairy when you go there for dinner. >> they're russian so they don't speak english. >> they probably don't know what's going on, probably. >> she's very mature for her age and she's helped me through so much. she went through the hard times, went through this whole operation. every day -- >> tell me about that. >> i had my knees replaced and she was with me from day one, every day she was by my side. >> that's night. >> she slept every night with me on the extra bed decide me. because they knew i couldn't do without her. she was there for me. >> you were married five times before, right? >> my ex-wives and i are all friendly. >> that's nice.
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when you were in the band with bruce, i read that he had two rules for the band, no drugs and be on time. what do you think was harder to stick with? >> being on time i guess was harder. >> and you say that bruce's wife patty likes you? is that true. >> yeah, we're friends. >> you're friends with patty? >> i think people thought there was some animosity because bruce and i were so close, same old, same old. >> maybe she thought you were luring the groupies towards bruce. >> if i was married to a guy who was on the road like you guys were, i would be very nervous. >> if you got a man like bruce or a man like me, you don't have to worry about that kind of thing because we're so dedicated to our music and what we're doing is so important to me. >> but you had time to have five wives. >> that was like my job, just
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looking for the right one. >> you also had an interesting -- well, you talked about your knees. but the other thing i saw in the book that was interesting to me, red foxx, the comedian red sox sox--red foxx, he told you to watch out for bruce because he was a white guy? >> he was being funny. >> oh, i see. >> he was like a lot of the older comedians and actresses, actors, they have this kind of thing of not trusting me. anybody, not just trusting him. anybody, black or white. >> now, you know, bruce has been on countless magazine covers, but this was a recent one that caught my eye. he was on the cover of aarp magazine? >> on his 60 birthday, they celebrated his 60 ear 0th birth.
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>> how did he feel about that being on aarp on his 60th birthday? >> it's kind of like a celebration. >> the tickets were very expensive, but with the senior citizen discount, it was very good. >> thanks very much for coming on. i love you. back with comedian and actress susiestman in just a minute.
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earlier this week, one of my best friends and the wonderful comedian susiess man stopped by. i had to ask her why she thought -- >> she saw me on the rose. he was casting jeff's wife who he wanted to have a certain facility with language. he called me up and gave me the part. the interesting thing about that is i almost wasn't on the roast. because the fryers club which i had made my bones at, with all their events. >> it's not easy. >> not easy. because you're really dealing
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with some very heavy duty comics over there. >> legends. allan king, whatever. and so, anyway, so the fryers club fought for me to be on that roast. comedy central didn't want me on that roast because i was not their demographic. and the fryers club fought for me to be on that roast. and to me that was all about how, both of us, how we did our careers for many years, which is just you keep showing up, everybody was knocking us down, and knocking us down and you keep showing up and showing up and doing good work and doing good work. >> and that took you out of your depression, stand up? and you had a lot of therapy, let's not pretend that didn't help. >> i had a lot of analysis, psycho analysis. >> and your life just opened up for you after having years of difficulties and then you got
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married at the advanced age of -- >> 53. that was the whole thing i have a whole chapter about that in the book. when they wanted to put the wedding announce in the "new york times," they said you're going to have to say your age. and i said i don't give a damn, put my age in there, and then they said the bride, 53 is keeping her name. and then they saidest man, 53. >> "people" magazine is like that. before you go, because i promoted this. you must tell people how they know if they husband is gayed. >> i have a husband called gay, not gay, should be gay. >> just give us the top three. >> he owns five cats and they're all named after characters in barbara standwick movies. he spends an inordinate a lot of time worrying about pillow
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shams. he rolls his eyes and says whatever on at least three occasion. in hollywood they say if a guy has the photos of the family facing in, he's straight, if he has the family photos facing out, then he's gay. >> the book can called, "what would susie say" and she knows everything. up next, president obama arno and his fight with the fringe right. stick around.
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the biggest news in politics this week has been the obama administration's attack on fox news. earlier this week i got a chance to ask jeanine garofalo about that very thing. do you think it's a good idea? >> i don't think that he's picking a fight. and i wouldn't characterize that as blasting. he seemed very reserved there. but i think fox news in general has always been unkind to any democrat, whether they be in the white house or outside of it. i would agree with that. i don't see the value in fox
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news and going on fox news for those people. it's a very -- >> you don't see the value? >> no, i don't see the value. there's no reason for somebody who has something substantive to talk about to go talk to hannity or go talk to bill o'reilly or fox and friends or really any of their very obvious propaganda machine. having said that most main stream news entities are wanting. most main stream news entities are sub par, and tell versions of stories. >> some people say msnbc has a mission statement from the left, i think you would agree with that? >> and to jeanine's point, i think they all suffer from some kind of bias. but the value of going on fox or msnbc is that you're speaking to a huge swathe of the country and in obama's case, this is the very demographic that he needs
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right now to get on board with health care and afghanistan. >> do you think they'll ever come on board with obama over at fox? those viewers? i don't even think they would ever come on board. >> if the obama administration would stop condescending and ignoring and insulting those people who don't like a public option, then i think, yeah, they would be more interested in what he has to say, but they don't like being dised, which is kind of like what the white house is doing right now. >> there's no con detenti ee's g from the white house. fox's whole reason for being is to obstruct and to try and make inroads with the average fox viewer is a follol's errand. there's no way. >> as comedians, you don't go in front of audiences that hate us after a while. >> oh, no. >> after a while, you just say
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no, former bush advisor and current fox news contributor carl rose got his two cents? >> this is an administration that's getting very arrogant and slippery in its dealings with people. they're going to come hard at you and cut your legs off. >> talk about calling the pot the kettle. this is complete hypocrisy on karl rove's part. >> he's absolutely right, you don't silence the opposition. that's just not politically a good move. it doesn't make a whole lot of sense for obama to completely sensor an entire demographic or an entire media organization that speaks to a large demographic. >> but karl rove is responsible for possibly firing the united states attorneys who are not loyal to bush. so that's really silencing a whole group of people, isn't that very similar? >> there are some nuances to that story that i don't think we
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have time to really delineate, really, here? it doesn't matter who's saying it, i think karl rove is right, this is a politically silly move. it doesn't look presidential, it doesn't make the president look serious, it makes him look a little whiney. >> of course we're going to disagree with each other. there's just no two ways around that we will take opposing sides of this. karl rove is the master of silence and he is responsible for the attorney general firings without any nuance. and attacking any dissending of the bush administration. but there is no sensoring going on. saying some of them won't go on that show has nothing to do with sensoring, fox news is a complete propaganda news outlet. that's not to say that other outlets are good. >> they seem to have the intention to be obscuring and
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obstructing the obama administration. i don't think that that was the intention of cnn or msnbc. >> during the bush administration? i think it was. >> they were critical of it, but there were a lot of things to criticize, really a lot. >> i think fox was critical of the obama administration as a reaction. it's filling a void. it's as a reaction to the lack of criticism, the lack of anything. >> don't call it fair and balanced. >> you're not talking about the same thing, there's opinion shows like hannity and o'reilly. i don't think anyone would call shepard's news show unbiassed. >> i think chris wallace's show. he could have gone on chris wallace's show i think chris tries to be fair and balanced and he has one democrat on the panel and he has some other attack dogs on the panel. but progress sifs aren't just taking on the president. they're now taking on senate majority leader harry reid in
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nevada. listen. >> i'm your typical swing voter, i have voted for republicans for president and i voted for president obama. i also voted for senator harry reid many times, but in 2010, i'll only be voting on one issue. i'm watching to see if harry reid is strong and effective enough as a leader to pass a public health insurance option into law. >> okay, since reid is in trouble in nevada i think 52% of nevadans are in favor of the public option. is he going to be forced to pub the public option? >> i would hope. i don't understand why some democrats like harry reid are being as obstructionist as the republicans. there's nothing wrong with infighting among parties, there shouldn't be anybody marching lock step with one another. >> the baucus bill hasn't got it in there and i'm wondering how
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the democrats are going to do in 2010 if they don't get it. what you think? >> hopefully they would suffer for it, as they should. the public option should be in there and there should be like grayson, is that his name, alan grayson, great guy, speaks with conviction and i don't know why there aren't more democrats, there's a lot of great democrats, but a lot of them are too weak in the face of -- >> wussy -- >> that's fine. >> and harry reed is -- >> he's a wuss. >> and in the name of bipartisanship which is a farce. there is no need to pursue bipartisanship with a group of people that will have no interest in bipartisanship, so he should be criticized. >> i agree bipartisanship is really a silly kind of goal. but at the same time, i -- >> why do you think it's a silly goal? isn't that the ideal?
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>> these are incredibly important issues, people feel very passionate about them. trying to come to consensus is watering down these issues. and no one wins when you try to please everyone. people should stick to their guns. and frankly in nevada inform, i don't know if this poll is entirely accurate. and if nevada wants a public option, as much as i detest it, harry reid should vote for it. absolutely he should represent his constituents. >> sarah palin posted her resume on the social net working site linked in. why does she do this? she's looking for a job, right? >> i guess that makes sense, then. she's being industrious and posting her rev nay. >> she says she's governor. she's not governor anymore. >> well, she was. >> that ship has sailed. >> i mean was it a joke? >> i don't think she has that great a sense of humor that she
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would pull something like that. >> she's unconventional. she's on facebook a lot. she twitters and she's reaching out in every way she knows how. people like to say she's crazy, but she generally proves out to be crazy like a fox. >> i don't think she's crazy at all. >> there's people who routinely call her crazy and a whole host of other names. >> would you call her crazy, jeanine? >> i think she's an intellectually uncharactered person with charisma. >> that's very well put. but her very favored uppopulari rates are going down. is it possible that her 15 minutes are up? >> no, she's been out of the spotlight, she's written her book. >> maybe she wants to be the next paris hilton. >> that's a little cheap and mitt romney has been out of the spotlight and his favorability is down a little bit.
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and mike huckabee's is up because he's on fox news all the time. when she's out in the public, her favor bltd will go up again. >> i never thought that george bush would ever become president and he did. >> such a young person. i'm hoping you're doing an art installation project. >> i must be joking. >> i'm praying that you are a -- this is a very complex situation, this international -- >> thank you, girls, thank you, ladies. i couldn't say girls. i shouldn't say girls, we're men. back with more in a bit.
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who's this? >> hi, dr. helder, i'm lindsay thorn, i'm mag give's supervise and she's confused and about to get fired and we just need you to confirm for our records that you're treating a man named david williams. >> what is your medicare id number? >> um, i'm not sure, we're in the process of converting to the metric system. >> well, that was the brilliant lily tomlin in "desperate housewives." her new vegas show "not playing with a full deck" begins at the mgm grand. so lily, you're like a vegas girl now or what? >> yeah, no, i -- years ago when everybody -- people went to vegas to make big money, i
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wanted to go so badly for the money. but i couldn't bring myself to do it. this is in the 70s, early 80s so i did a big tv special about going for the money. to sort of sublimate the desire. i did character schtick with a message. i was doing this really high, artistic pretentious thing off broadway and so it's all about me going to vegas and corrupting it into a huge motorcycle and diving into the tanks. so now i really am going to vegas and i only wish i could dive in a tank and drive in on a motorcycle. >> call bette midler, she gets anything she wants. in fact bette's going to be there. >> i have seen her there, of course. i love bette, i did a movie with
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bette, "big business." two of me made movie a movie with her, we were twins. >> your work is considered a big body of work by so many people. you sort of always put it down that you didn't do it, that jane did it, jane wagner, your long-time partner. >> i can potchkey with things, but she brings a certain level to things, an elevated level. >> she's written most of your shows, right? >> she certainly wrote "the search" that was the zenith for me, "the search" the search for signs of intelligent life in the universe. >> even the title is intimidating. >> but this show is not very embracing, it embraces the human species. >> that's when you started screaming, enough with the cake,
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stop talking about the take. >> that's appearing nightly, that's the teenager, right, but in search of marie, they're grandparents, and it's their daughter's granddaughter who's in "the search" agnes angst. everything grows older except' death ann, she's still 6. >> how long were you with jane. >> 36 years. 39 in march. >> will you get married if california makes it legal? >> i certainly want gay people to be able to be married, absolutely. >> if mthey want to, yes. >> do you want to? >> the wardrobe alone is an or deal and i would have to postpone the reception because jane wouldn't be there on time, she wouldn't show up. >> she's like that. she's a darling person. >> she's totally wonderful.
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>> she's a lovely person. >> but she's a southern girl, she has no sense of time, but when she gets there, she's so gracious and people see so little of her because she has no sense of or fear of social obligation. so i go all the time and i'm like such an -- i'm like an old shoe. and then when they find out she's coming, they elbow me aside to get to her. >> she has no interest to be on camera, on stage? >> no. she was an actress too when she was a young girl and got brilliant reviews, she played laura in "the glass menagerie." that was the place, because she was from tennessee of the bartters in virginia. but connie due hurst used to play there. but she's very sensitive, she wouldn't take the stuff you and i take. it was business. >> it's tough because there's a lot of criticism. how do you deal with that? how do you deal with criticism? >> i just cry, cry, cry.
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i tell you a story, i auditioned once for -- remember when renee taylor wrote "loves never strangers" and it was going to be on broadway and chuck groeden directed it and her boyfriend comes over and for five minutes he tells her why they're not going to get married and at the end, she says, "can you pick up your tux? i didn't have any sense of to be an actress just to listen and be in the moment. and chuck pulled a chair up, later, i mean i know him very well and i have done a movie with him and everything, but he pulls up a chair and he says, honey, have you ever acted before? >> oh, how humiliatinhumiliatin? >> i went in the phone booth and i cried. >> how old were you? a kid? >> i was a late bloomer that's why i look so well. >> i'm a late bloomer too.
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>> i was in my 20s, because i didn't come to new york until i was about 20. >> it's pretty bad, the criticism and the rejection. >> the rejection is terrible. >> i don't know how kids do it. >> nowadays it's even block it out. i'm still scared when i go on stage. >> still sense a little stage fright? >> yeah. i want to be to glorious. >> carol burnett wrote one time she went out and wasn't nervous and just bombed. you have to be a little scared. lawrence olivia had stage fright. >> it's natural. if you care about what you're doing and want the audience -- it's like a blind date. you want it to be a great, wonderful experience. >> i also think when you're a performer art person, like we are, it's like being a ballet dancer in the sense you don't know how high you're going to be able to leap that night. >> right. >> it's just not in your hands to hold on to.
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it's -- >> you get inspiration or are suddenly in the zone and just floating somewhere, you know? you can just soar and you cannot soar. >> or you can get sore. we'll be back with more from lily tomlin in just a bit.
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30 days for one glazed donut. >> a 59-cent donut. >> if it had been rock 'n' roll she could have thrown sofas out the window. you don't know what kind of passersby at the bottom. when you were playing christian family audiences like we were, you forget to pay for a donut, they throw you out like garbage. i'm back here with lily tomlin. >> i was lucky enough to do five films associated with bob.
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>> nashville. >> nashville was my first movie. >> you were great in that. >> i got nominated too. >> everyone had a crush in keith in that. he was so cool. women love a guy like that who doesn't pay attention to anybody. >> it's unfortunate, isn't it? >> it's wrong, totally. >> one of the things i read about you one time when you were a kid, you weren't a good student, i take, it were you? >> no -- >> you were smart. i can relate to something you said. you said, if your hair didn't look like i wouldn't go to school. >> out of three years, cumulatively i was absent one year in high school. >> all those bad hair days? >> i was a cheerleader. by the end of the week on friday, my hair started to get in shape and i'd cheer the game and i would get in trouble. mind picture would get in the school paper. one year out of three years i was absent. >> wow.
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laughing -- we were talking about laughing during the break. who was mean on laughing? there's always somebody who's nasty on those shows. there's one person everybody hates. >> not on our show. >> everybody got along? >> the kids were all great. maybe -- i came in the third year. >> they hated them the first two years? it's what it is. >> who is it? >> i'm not saying. it's too mean. >> was it one of the guys? mel? martin? >> no, no, no. someone else. is this new show in vegas, is it all characters? >> bunch of characters. and, you know, it's not like i'm doing a theater piece. >> no. >> so it's much more informal and fooling around. >> fooling around. it doesn't have the through line and organizing principle to it like your other shows? >> yes. art. >> it has art. oh, excuse me. >> art and a deep commitment to the audience's enjoyment. >> before we go, clear up something about jane wagner. she wrote that famous line that
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ann richards said about george bush. >> being born with a silver foot in this mouth. >> everybody thought ann richards said it. >> she's never really been credited with it. you know? ann was a very good friend of ours and we were playing at the kennedy center in washington and ann was going to be the keynote speaker that year. jane was faxing lines to her and stuff. we sat down that monday night. i was dark that night. to watch the show. when they said -- we didn't know what ann would pick. that's one of the lines she picked. it was like it exploded. we didn't think it was one of the better lines. we thought it was a good line. >> hilarious line. he deserved it. thanks for coming on. >> my great pleasure. >> good luck with the new show. >> thank you. >> thank you all for watching tonight. good night, everybody. >> good night, everybody.
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we were able to obtain some physical evidence through some analysis of some of the evidence. all honesty, some written evidence. we were able to develop a person of interest through -- once we reached that person and interviewed them, ultimately they led us to where we have recovered elizabeth's body. we're not going to have a lot to add to it at this time. a profound number of resources both from volunteers that have
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been here, the vfw, the american red cross, but in addition, our brothers and firefighters as well as the highway patrol, fbi and the police department and certainly the office of the sheriff. we're not able to spend a great deal on it other than to tell you the person that led us to this is also a juvenile. >> as you have just heard from missouri investigators, a heartbreaking end in the search for 9-year-old elizabeth olton. just like 7-year-old north florida girl somer thompson, elizabeth vanishes walking alone just a short distance from her own home and she never makes it. moments ago, police find the 9-year-old's body. i'm jean casarez of the legal network "in session" in for nancy grace tonight. thank you for joining us. we're going to bring you the latest developments in the search for somer thompson's killer. let's two to lad egan, news
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director with cnn affiliate krcg for more on this breaking news. lad, what have you learned? >> hi, jean. it's heartbreak in the capital city of missouri tonight. i just got off the phone with the sheriff you were listening to just a moment ago. he told me interesting facts about how they came to find the body of 9-year-old elizabeth olton. he said that they received a handwritten note. he wouldn't elaborate. if someone brought it to them or they found it. they said that note led them to find a juvenile, who is a person of interest. it was that juvenile that led them to the body in the woods. >> where exactly was the body found? out in the woods, where? >> he said that it is near the home, but we're talking about a square mile radius they were searching. they knew to search in this area because she had a cell phone on her. at&t was able to triangulate the area.
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they were in the area twice and didn't come to the body until the juvenile led them to the body. >> this is breaking news coming into the newsroom right now. a precious little elementary school student, 9 years old. elizabeth olton. she had visited a friend. she was walking home very close to where her friend was. it was about 6:15 in the evening, wednesday night. she never made it home. her body has just been discovered. matt zarrell, nancy grace producer. you've been on this story from the beginning. what more can you tell us? >> the juvenile is older than elizabeth and also an aquan tense of elizabeth. apparently elizabeth knew this person. we also do not know if it's a boy or girl and do not know if they are going to be charged and if they will be charged, will they be charged as an adult? >> matt zarrell, we also know this person of interest is in custody. he or she is in custody, correct? >> yes, this person is.
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they led them to the body of elizabeth. >> one other question, was an amber alert ever called out in this case for this little elementary school student that went missing? >> no. an amber alert was never issued. >> let us go out to pat brown, criminal profiler and author of, "killing for sport." you know, pat, we heard about this case when it happened. this little girl in missouri, 9 years old. went missing. didn't come home. authorities said we're not going to call out an amber alert. we have no evidence of foul play. kids go in the woods, they play. and we just aren't sure about anything. this was 6:15 at night. she was 9 years old, not 19. but 9. what do you make of this, pat? >> it always sounds bad. if you are not a police officer, you say, how could they do that? why didn't they rush out to do something? the fact is, they get so many calls and the children show up an hour or two later. oh, i was at my friend's house. oh, i didn't call you, mom. i went to the store.
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i was playing. they get it so often, they cannot call it an amber alert every single time. the other horrifying fact, when these children are, indeed, attracted or abducted, they usually are dead within 30 minutes to an hour. by the time the alert goes out, almost always, the child is already dead which is really unfortunate. therefore, you have to really decide what you're going to do about those amber alerts. i would like to say we'll put it on neighbor alert, but if the child shows up, you pay for it. i think that's a great response to that. >> march to your legislator. that is a very good idea. to dr. david posey, medical examiner. pathologist of glen oaks pathology in los angeles, california. they just found this little girl's body in the woods. can you describe for us, forensically, what will happen as her body proceeds to the medical examiner's office? >> yes, jean. the first thing that will happen is the scene will be obvious ll cordoned off and the police and the medical investigators from
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the coroner's office will glean as much data and as much evidence as they can. the body will then be sealed in a bag with a tag on it so they will be able to identify this body with that bag. it will be taken to the coroner's office where it will be refrigerated until the time of the autopsy which is a standard procedure on something like this. >> once again, breaking news. a little body was just found of this precious, beautiful girl posing in that photo with that telephone. out to the lawyer, susan moss, family law attorney, child advocate out of new york. ray giudice, defense attorney out of chicago. tamara holder, defense attorney out of chicago, illinois. first of all, to susan moss, there is a person of interest in custody tonight. he is a juvenile. they say he was an aquan tense of this little girl. what does that tell you? >> it tells me this wasn't a game of hide and go seek gone wrong.
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it was ridiculously more serious than that. the fact this juvenile didn't immediately call in and say there was an accident leads me to think this was something way more nefarious than that. we're going to be looking at very, very serious charges and depending on how old the juvenile is, we'll see if he or she is charged as an adult. >> exactly. that's my next question to ray giudice. defense attorney. they're saying this person of interest in custody is a bit older than 9-year-old elizabeth. >> it's a close call, jean. it's very much a sliding scale in juvenile law. the closer that young person is to 9 and farther away from 16 as juvenile court restrictions are, then you're going to have it treated as a juvenile court case. the closer that child is to 16, 17, you're highly likely to have that person treated as an adult, if, a big if there are criminal charges. >> what does it say to you,
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tamara holder, defense attorney out of chicago? they're calling this person a person of interest. they are not labeling him or her as a suspect. it merely could be someone that is an accessory after the fact that has knowledge that may not be the real perpetrator in all of this. >> i don't think so. i think they knew this kid was the perpetrator right away. i don't believe that there's something called a person of interest. it's a fake term for suspect. they knew this was the kid right away. they went in for him. they talked to him. they got a confession i assume. he led them to the body and they have the guy. fortunately, it was two days later. the evidence and confession are preserved. >> back to lad egan, news director, anchor cnn affiliate krcg. this is a little girl. she's 9 years old, lad. what do you know about her? tell us about her. what grade was she in? what was she like? >> she is a fourth grader, and there's an elementary school
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that was just built near her home and we've talked with the school as well. there is heartache. this is the news no one wanted. we talked with relatives. they say she was shy, at the same time, outgoing, especially around the family and with her nieces and nephews. she was really just a joy and it's been tragic. when they look at just those four houses that she had to walk by in order to get to her home, home from her friend's home, twilight, wednesday evening, people can't believe this happened. >> lad egan, is it true volunteers wanted to take their time to help search for this little girl and they were turned away? >> yes. there's been outrage about that. i got clarification from the sheriff today. yesterday, thursday, this is, you know, still 12 hours after she went missing, hundreds were showing up at the command post to volunteer. they got around 200 there actively searching and the sheriff decided they didn't need
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more because they had defined it to this smaller area because of the cell phone, so they weren't broadening out the search at that time. some people were sent away and people were upset about that. at the same time the sheriff said everyone was wearing gps locaters on them so they were seen on a map what area they were covering. they said they covered that area twice, which makes me wonder was the body hidden somehow? this juvenile was able to lead the authorities right to the body. >> the cell phone pings, matt zarrell, nancy grace producer, that they found wednesday evening, the pings from her cell phone were behind the home she lived in in the wooden area? >> yes. it was in the wooded area. what they had done, they had triangulated the cell phone's location using the pings. unfortunately on thursday morning the pings stopped and they believed the battery went dead but they have recovered the cell phone since.
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>> where was the body found in relation to the cell phone pings? >> cops aren't releasing that information, but we do know it was in the heavily wooded area near where searchers were focusing their effort today. >> all right. near where they were focusing their effort today. they had been in the area of the pings before, it just appears for some reason, they didn't come upon the body? >> yeah. they searched twice in that area. at first, they were looking for the cell phone. they did not find the cell phone. now, they have found it unfortunately, along with elizabeth. >> to pat brown, criminal profiler out of minneapolis, should you turn away volunteers when they're offering to come forward? >> if you get too many volunteers everything gets chaotic and you can't control what's going on. you overlook areas. you can damage evidence. i think they made the correct choice at the time. the other thing about the body, there's two things. one is the possibility, when you have a small body, it's amazing how hidden they can get. the second thing is the body may have been brought back after that area was searched. >> we're in a second going to go
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to the somer thompson case in north florida. two young girls both alive days ago, now both dead. how does -- how do communities reconcile that? >> if you'd ever had anybody go in and reach inside you and pull your heart out, that's what it's like. she's an angel.
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every night hln's nancy grace brings you the real drama straight from the courtroom. >> every lawyer has a different version of what they would think justice is. >> tnt mondays, raising the bar is all new. >> to me, justice is a jury rendering a verdict that speaks the truth. >> do you trust them? that's what this case comes down to. >> steven bochco's raising the bar on tnt. pick up nancy's new book "eleventh victim" available now wherever books are sold. investigators in clay
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county, florida, say none of the registered sex offenders live in her neighborhood are suspects in the death of somer thompson. her body was found wednesday in a landfill in georgia. no one saw the 7-year-old get abducted. on monday. at least no witnesses have come forward. >> please, you don't have to tell them who you are. help us find who this is. i don't want to see another parent feel empty. >> authorities have been checking evidence from a vacant house in somer's neighborhood that's been undergoing investigation. >> they have spent hours meticulously picking through every piece of evidence they can find. crews are looking for evidence in the area where somer was last seen. >> the last person to see somer, appears to have been a little boy who lives nearby. he says he saw her near this vacant house. >> juan was one of the last people to see somer alive when he was riding his bike home from
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school. >> she was running, so i thought she was excited, but she had a frown on her face. >> the autopsy is complete. authorities will not say how she died. >> my son, when he found out, my oldest, he punched things, he just bawled, he just fell out. for a child, a son, a boy, men don't show emotion a lot. >> i forgive them for what they have done because the lord says i have to. as far as -- as far as what i'm feeling, it's pure anger. wow, there are some really sick people in this world. >> we, all of us, our whole entire family, my friends, everyone, we're devastated. i can't believe that they would put my baby in the trash. >> i'm jean casarez of the legal network "in session" in for nancy grace tonight.
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we take you from missouri to north florida where a killer is on the loose. a murder investigation is continuing into the murder of 7-year-old somer thompson, her body found in a land fill just days ago. let's go straight out to tiffany griffith, reporter with wokv radio. what's the latest on this investigation? >> as you can see right now, we're gathered at one of the major malls in the area. folks are gathering for a rally in support of somer. they want to make sure it doesn't happen to another kid here in the orange park area but nowhere across the nation. here's the new information we know as of 4:00. all sex offenders have been interviewed and stories cleared. there are many in this area who are wondering who this could be connected to. there's a suspect out of jacksonville who apparently was questioned but no arrests have been made so far. they have 900 leads that have come in to their offices. 200 of them still need to be checked out. we are waiting to see if
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anything substantial comes out of there. they continue to analyze evidence from that gano avenue home. it's being processed by the florida deparent of law enforcement. no new details or anything substantial coming from there or the bag of trash that came from a bathroom at a nearby park. here's what's interesting out of the news conference at 4:00. investigators say they're also looking at the trash that was found near somer's body at the georgia land fill. it's producing information that will help them narrow down where her body may have been dumped. >> to natisha lance, nancy grace producer standing there live at the scene. investigators are very focused on an abandoned home that witnesses say was one of the last places that little, somer thompson was seen. what is that investigation including? >> that's right, jean. multiple witnesses placed somer here the last time she was seen. workers worked late into the night. they had on full jumpsuits.
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they were looking through a construction dumpster that was on the sight. that dumpster, what investigators are telling us, has not been emptied since the time somer went missing and still has not been emptied. they thoroughly searched the dumpster and tom it has a bit there was a fire at the home at some point and time. of a history. at that home there was ultraviolet light testing going on. if you looked through the window you could see bright blue lights, bright green lights taking place in there. they worked late into the night. they finished up at 1:00 a.m. and were working at the location tonight. >> is that designated a crime scene? is there tape around that home right now? >> there is. investigators are saying there's no physical evidence that led them to this investigation. what led them there are the witnesses that saw her there the last time she was seen.
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in the middle of hundreds of people holding hundreds of candles, somer thompson's mom dina, huddled with others in front of the vigil set up for their daughter. >> i'll miss her. >> dina thanked volunteers and offered to pay them back for their efforts. >> i don't know how i could ever repay any of you for helping me and looking for my baby. >> as volunteers, neighbors, and strangers stood in front of teddy bears and a poster of somer, many sang "you are my
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sunshine," including her mother who said it was her favorite song. >> i'm jean casarez, legal network "in session" in for nancy grace tonight. i want to go out to a very special guest. a member of her family. she's somer thompson's aunt joining us out of graham, north carolina. thank you for joining us. we want to know about somer. we want to know about the little girl we see smiling in that picture. talk to us about what was she like? what did she like to do with her family? what was her favorite subject in school? >> she was such a loving child and so energetic and spunky. her favorite thing to do was run around the yard and play with her dolls and play with her brothers and sisters. she was just so loving. she used to say all the time, "i want a hug, huggy bear." she was just the most loving
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child. she was so precious. we're heartbroken. >> i don't think any of us can imagine. >> i can't imagine what evil monster did this to such a precious, sweet child. >> i don't think any of us can imagine what you are going through, what you are living. what is so real for you. i want to ask about somer thompson's father. i know he's in north carolina and i heard he recently had pretty major surgery, but yet he's going to make it to florida, right? >> he was in a car accident that damaged his right knees, crushed the bone. he had major reconstructive where they put pins and rods and stuff. so he's not to put any weight on that for three months. he's in a wheelchair. i've been trying to help take care of him, but it's hard for him to get around, as you can imagine, if you can't walk on your -- >> how is he going to make it to florida? >> we have been donated a
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handicap van, so he can get from the wheelchair to the chair in the van. then back into the wheelchair, again. >> i just want her found. i want someone to have to pay for what has been done to my family. >> is there anything you need? >> my baby back. that's all i can say. ddddd
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think that when she ran off, she was upset and she got to a point and decided to stop and wait and that this predator was waiting. he had been waiting. that was a perfect opportunity. there was no one else around. that's the only thing i can think. probably told her, i'm going to take you to your mommy. >> the tears are dried up. i'm just -- i'm so angry i can't express with words.
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>> you don't take from somebody. you didn't take her from just me, you took her from my family and you took her from all these people and you don't do this for a little baby. >> they're disregarding my child like a piece of trash. >> and put my baby in the trash like she's nothing. it's not okay. >> there's no measure of punishment that she deserves except the same death my daughter went through. >> i will not sleep until this person is found. i hope they get you and i hope they make you pay. >> i hope they crucify him. >> don't be lackadaisical on this. i told them, if you talk to a stranger, don't talk to a stranger. walk away. don't necessarily have to yell if they are asking you something. if they are trying to coax you into getting into a car, yell. obviously, we see, even that didn't make a difference.
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please, you don't have to tell them who you are. you don't have to -- you're not going to be in trouble if you give the answers. just help us find who this is. don't let another -- i never thought, in all my life that i would ever have to do this. even know anybody. i don't want to see another parent feel empty. i should have figured out some other way for them to get home, a different job. i don't know. i'm their mom and i'm supposed to protect them and i didn't. one of the things that upsets me the most, because what i feel, i can't verbalize. i never thought -- i wish i wouldn't have to be here and experience this, but i don't think if it wasn't for my friends and my family and these people that i would even be able to get through this. >> i'm jean casarez of the legal
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network "in session" in for nancy grace tonight. a community in fear for the safety of their children. a killer is at large in this north florida community in the murder of 7-year-old somer thompson. i want to go out to ellie jostad, nancy grace producer. ellie, there are multiple crime scene investigations going on, tonight as we speak, in multiple states. explain that to us. >> that's right. in addition to the house on gano avenue, the vacant house where somer was last seen, there's an investigation going on right there right now. the florida department of investigation is combing through that house. while that's going on, we have 55 miles to the north at a landfill in georgia, we have a similar investigation where they are going through painstakingly 225 tons of trash to try to find any sort of evidence at that location where somer's body was found. >> i want to go out to a special
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guest, laura, the aunt of somer thompson. thank you for joining us under such a trying time, but a time that investigators are trying to find who murdered your beautiful, beautiful relative. when was the last time you spoke with somer? >> a few months ago. >> what did she say? >> over the phone. what? >> what did she say to you? >> she told me that she loved me and we couldn't wait to see each other again. she asked about her kitty that was here, rosy. she loves kitty cats and puppy dogs. >> were there plans for the holidays? >> my husband had already taken two weeks off from work for christmas. we were going to go down and see them at christmastime. we just hadn't got to talk about it and discuss it.
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now we'll never get to see her again. >> you have such beautiful memories of such a lovely, precious, precious little girl whose life was cut so short. we are so sorry for your loss. >> thank you. >> i want to go to lisa rucab who is a neighbor and a friend of somer thompson and her whole family. lisa, you have helped so much in all of this with support and help with the community. talk to us about the community where somer thompson and her mother, where they lived. what is it like out there in north florida? >> oh, we have a wonderful neighborhood. north florida all together is wonderful. we have a wonderful close-knit community that we live in. everybody usually -- we all watch out for each other's children. we just help each other when they need help. if a parent is not -- picking up
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a child, it's nothing for someone to pick up a phone and just ask, hey, can you pick her up today, pick him up today? it's no problem. we all share that job. >> have you seen the vacant house that investigators have now designated a crime scene that they are staying at to continue to collect evidence? have you seen it? >> i have not seen the actual house, but know where it is. >> how close is it to where somer lived? how close? >> approximate ly -- half a mil? >> half a mile. just about half way home. was this the regular route that somer and her twin brother and little sister, the regular route they walked every day after school? >> yes, ma'am. all the children in our neighborhood walk these same -- that's the only way to get there. you have to walk, you have to take that route. straight up one sidewalk -- >> yeah, go ahead. >> excuse me? >> go ahead, please.
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>> it's straight up one sidewalk, you get to one cross guard, you take a left and it's right down, there's usually a police officer there making sure the children are safe in between the next cross guard. they get past that one and there's another cross guard and you're at the school. >> unbelievable. so susan moss, family law attorney, child advocate. the reason i ask the question if this was a regular route that little somer thompson walked, that could be very important evidence because this is going to be a first-degree murder case. this, i believe, is going to be a death penalty case. we are in florida. there are special circumstances for death penalty case. this fits it. it's a little girl under the age of 12. it could be a felony. a killing during the commission of a felony. but if it's the regular route she walked, this also could be premeditated and preplanned. >> absolutely and that also means the death penalty.
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the reason they want to know if it's the regular route, they want no know whether this person had been watching her for several days. that might produce more evidence. maybe more witnesses. her body found in a dump will only intensify the hunt. look at this mother. anyone who saw anything needs to come forward. we need to make sure our children are safe. by getting this scumbag off the streets, that's the only way we can to it. >> to dr. david posey, very short time we have, but dna, forensics critically important on this body. i know about the touch dna that now investigators can get when someone touches the clothing of a child like this. >> that's correct. touch dna actually is very important because the last person to touch the object or the individual, that dna will be there. so they will glean that evidence and data and get the fingerprints and have that available. >> that can possibly link them
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i just want them to know that everything they are doing is not in vain. i mean, i've had grown men over here cry on my shoulder and tell me they feel like they didn't do enough. i don't want anybody to feel like that. everybody did so much. it just was what it was. i want you to know that i will not sleep until this person is found. i hope they get you and i hope they make you pay for a long,
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long time. i just love her and i'll miss her. >> i just want him found. i want someone to pay for what's been done to my family. we're really a lot alike. she had my same personality. i miss holding her and giving her a kiss and not knowing if i said i love her. i know she knew that but you never know. >> i'm very confident we are going to have a positive outcome and find the people or people -- person or people responsible for the death of this beautiful child. >> you don't take from somebody. you didn't take her from just me, you took her from my family, you took her from all these people. you don't do this to a little baby and put my baby in the trash like she's nothing.
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it's not okay. this sick -- i don't know what i'm allowed to say, but this sick man, person, what -- he's not a man, he's not a person, was waiting. he'd been waiting. it was a perfect opportunity. there was no one else around. it's the only thing i can think and probably told her i'm going to take you to your mommy. >> there is a child killer on the loose and that's why we're going to catch this person and bring him to justice. >> watch out, we're coming. we're going to get you. i'm jean casarez of the legal network "in session" in for nancy grace tonight. out to patricia saunders, clinical psychologist. dina, who we have just seen, has shown tremendous grace hours after she found out her daughter was murdered. she has to be in shock. where does she get the strength to go in microphones in front of the country? >> i don't think she's in shock.
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most people shut down emotionally. they would be numb and feel nothing. they would become passive and withdraw, which is a normal response. what miss thompson is able to do is find the best kind of resiliency. she's talking about her feelings, not just her anger, but her own doubts. she's reaching out to other people and giving voice to probably what the whole country is feeling. having a social network, being a person of faith, having a strong family are those factors that help people live through this worst kind of trauma. >> dina thompson was, this morning, on the "today" show talking again to the country to help find her daughter's killer. take a listen. >> we're coming for you. >> are you confident they will be able to find your daughter's killer? >> i want to be confident, but i was confident that she was going to come home, and she didn't.
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but i know they're working and doing it and i have faith in them. just how beautiful she was. how sweet and innocent and just wanted to always -- just wanted to be friends with everybody. always, it takes a couple seconds to tell them you love them. tell them you love them. you don't know what's going to happen. just -- just make them aware of stranger danger. i tried with somer. i feel like i failed, obviously. >> nobody would say that. >> if it just helps one. >> that's somer thompson's mother on nbc's "today" show this morning. i want to go to lisa, neighbor and friend of the family standing there live in orange port, florida, near the family's
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home. you have rallied people. you and your neighbors very quickly, to form a group called moms against predators. tell us all about that group. >> well right now over to the left they're having a different kind of -- the rally's over to our left. there's a lot of people. i'm very overwhelmed that have showed up. basically, we are getting something together where the children are going to know that purple is safe. if they see any of us on the streets in between, they see trouble, any kind of trouble, if they're hurt, they don't feel good, anything, in between the crossing guard and the next step they have to get, we will be someone safe for them to come to. >> purple is good. does that correlate with the purple ribbon that miss thompson had in her hair yesterday? >> yes, ma'am. purple was somer's favorite color. so that is the color we have chosen and everything's purple now.
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we're going to let the children know -- yes, it is. they're going to let them know that it's a safe color for them to come to. >> to pat brown, criminal profiler. you know, whenever i see you on the air, pat, i stop everything i'm doing and listen because what you have to say about cases is something from experience and everything you've gone through. with everything we've seen now at this point in the case, what are your thoughts? >> i'm concerned about what the police said about clearing the 100 sex offender suspects. there's one way to do it. there's a pastor on a pulpit and you have 200 people in church watching you. another, you're seen on the videocamera sometime around the time of the crime far away or sitting in another country and couldn't get on an airplane. other than that, there's no way to clear these guys. either they have an idea of someone else who did it or they are not telling the truth. it concerned me. everybody out there should be looking at these guys.
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saying, look, if i saw that guy acting suspiciously, i know that person, he said something weird, done something weird, get that information to the police. don't discount it unless you can prove they weren't involved. >> to ray giudice, defense attorney out of atlanta. do you agree or disagree? you have 90 sex offenders and in a number of hours they've been eliminated. >> a lot of sex offenders are on gps, ankle bracelets and their exact position can be found and they can be cleared. we rounded up all the sex offenders in the previous case in missouri and it doesn't look like they had anything to do with this either. i'm not discounting what pat said, but i mean, this roundup of sex offenders, every single time a child is missing and intense focus on them to really the use of lack of resources on a different type of profile, i think may be a mistake. >> all right. tonight, cnn heroes.
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>> how y'all doing? at the first annual cnn hero tribute show i had the honor of performing and helping to recognize the great work orst everyday citizens changing the world. as the founder of yearly haiti, an organization that seeks to improve lives in my native country, i'm thrilled to help cnn introduce one of this year's top ten honorees. now more than ever the world needs heroes. >> life after katrina is really hard for a kid. you have violence, the drug life. i'm just tired of it. my aim is to get kids off the street. i started a free music education program for the kids of new orleans. let's go. horns up. we do more than just teach music. we offer transportation, we offer instruments. i feed you so you're not hungry.
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i give you tutoring. i call it the no excuse policy. no excuse why you're not here. don't have to have any experience. press down on it just like that. we meet five days a week. we constantly are learning something new. that's what keeps the kids coming back every day. ♪ i don't want to say i'm saving lives. i say i'm giving life. a whole different life of music.
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a look back at the stories making the headlines this week. you didn't take her from just me, you took her from my family, you took her from all of these people and you don't do this to a little baby and put my baby in the trash like she's nothing. that's not okay. this is not okay. >> we can now say officially that the medical examiner there has positively identified the body that was located in the landfill yesterday as the missing child from orange park, somer thompson.
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if someone has morgan, please let her come home safely. >> virginia state police are asking for the public to help locate this missing virginia tech student. she is morgan harrington. she has not been heard from since she and her friends went to a metallica concert saturday night in charlottesville, virginia. >> taking your calls live. her mother, jill harrington. ms. harrington, thank you for being with us. >> thank you so much for letting us come on and putting morgan's information out there. . >> oh my god, we have to get my son. >> how many legitimate 911 calls came in that day? how many people needed police, needed sheriffs, needed help? but no, everybody was consumed trying to save this 6-year-old boy's life, up in a balloon. he was never there. law enforcement urgently searching for 9-year-old elizabeth olton. elizabeth vanishes on a quarter
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of a mile walk from her friend's house to her own home. >> i just want my sister home safely. i don't know who would have done anything, but we all want her home safely. i want you to know that i will not sleep until this person is found. i hope they get you and i hope they make you pay. for a long, long time. >> who would murder this beautiful brown-eyed little cher rub and throw her away like trash? before somer's murderer lands in hell, we want this child killer now. tonight, let us stop to remember army sergeant james mcdonald. 26 years old from wisconsin. he was killed in iraq. on a second tour of duty, he was awarded the purple heart.
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army commendation medal and the humanitarian service medal. he loved football and dreamed of being a firefighter. he leaves behind his grieving parents joan and douglas. james mcdonald, he's an american hero. thank you so much to all of our guests and to you for being at home, being with us tonight. thank you so much, see you tomorrow night, 8:00 sharp eastern. until then, good night, everybody. hello, i'm a.j. hammer in new york. this is a "showbiz tonight" news break. at the top of the hour, michael jackson movie outrage. explosive new debate about whether "this is it" is misleading by keeping out scenes showing michael in bad shape. oprah under attack. why one of the trainers from the
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biggest loser is calling oprah misguided and misinformed. that is your "showbiz tonight" news break. tv's first most provocative entertainment news show.
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